SBS language | Minipod: Welcome to Native English 1

Transcription

(Note: this is not a verbatim transcription)

Kevin
Hello, you are listening to the SBS Learn English podcast

Josipa
or U.S helping Australians speak, understand and connect.

Kevin
My name is Kevin.

Josipa
My name is Josipa.

Kevin
I am a proud Ngarrindjeri man from the country of Ngarrindjeri in South Australia.

Josipa
And I am proud Croatian migrant still learning the English language.

Kevin
Your English is already
very goodJosipa but how is it with Aboriginal English?

Josipa
Don’t tell me there’s a difference between Australian English and Aboriginal English?

Kevin
This is exactly what I am saying! OWe are going to travel deep into Native English where the meaning of some common English words is different from your standard dictionary.

Josipa
Well, that sounded good, but I hope you’ll say it wasn’t in English because I didn’t understand a word!

Kevin
Nope, it is no English. What you heard is the beginning of Uluru’s heartfelt statement in the Pitjantjajara language that I know well Pitjantjajara people.

Josipa
It’s beautiful, Kevin. And how many indigenous languages ​​are there?

Kevin
In total, there are about 250 native languages, and if you want to hear some of them, you can search on the SBS website, just type Uluru Statement from the Heart and you can hear 20 different languages..

Josipa
I’m going certainly have listening. So where to start to learn Native English?

Kevin
Good, lets go start with Welcome youo Country. where else? Because this is indigenous land, and it always has been, and always will be to be indigenous then/a.

Josipa
I heard of a Welcome youo Country but sometimesat the beginning of events and meetings there is a ceremony called Acknowledgement of Country? Is it the same thing? And why did we have Welcome to Country in the first place?

Kevin
Good question. Before colonizationmy people had TRADITIONS. L.O.,RE social rules and structures in place maintain order and respect each other.

For example, you could not it is enough to cross another indigenous country. you needed to be hosted in this country, to travel safely, physically and spiritually. This is why we are doing the ceremony. IIt is a sign of respect.

And Tthe difference between the two is that Acknowledgement of Country is done when there is no traditional owner present for the ceremony. welcome to VScountry is always carried out by one of the crowd who belongs to this country.

Josipa
I see, it’s very clear now, thank you. So what is the first word you are teaching us today.

Kevin
You know how I said that The welcome to the country is always interpreted by one of the crowd. Good, crowd is the word I want to explain to you.

Here, he said, and I am reading of Standard English dictionary who a the crowd is”a large crowd of people, especially those who are disorderly and intend to cause trouble or violence.”

Good, for my people, the word crowd has a completely different meaning. Let me explain.

The word crowd is a common word used by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The word crowd for us basically means Aboriginal people.

For instance, I am an actor. So one of my favorite gigs is performing for the crowd. I’m playing Nope-native also, however, I to like play for the crowd. Indigenous comedians will call these crowd concerts.

Josipa
So, the English dictionary crowd and Aboriginal crowd meanings are different. I think I to know who I would have instead spend time with.

Kevin
yes I As hanging hang out with my mafia. I am a quite sociable dude, meaning I like spend time relax or socialize with people.

Aand it often happens that I am in a new place because I travel a lot for workso I often meet a lot of aboriginal people and when we to encounter we are wondering “Who is your crowd? Where do you come from?”

And if there is a social event on, I’m going interrogate, Where does all the mob recharge?

Josipa
Load? What does that mean?

Kevin
Good,
basically that means have a few drinks, you’re load. I have a joke about it. Thisis usually reserved for only my crowd concerts.

You know when a white person meets another white person. They have it all when they meet and greet. So another white person will walk up to another white person and say, “What are you doing?”

When aborigines get together it’s like “Hey, cuz, who’s your gang? Where are you from?” We make the link, it’s cultural, it’s deep. Once the connection is established, we will ask you for $20 reserve.

Josipa
Go on! So what else are you telling us today?

Kevin
Another word my crowd uses often is deadly. So when you hear my crowd say deadly, it’s not about something that is death or deadly.

We’re talking about something that’s impressive, excellent or great. This is what death means to Aboriginal people.

Actually, I have a funny true story. I won’t mention that local government council, but I will say it was in the state of Victoria.

What happened was that this local government got a $250,000 grant for an aboriginal anti-drug campaign. And what they did was they went crazy and just started campaigning without consulting the native community.

No consultation. And what they did was they put up posters all over the city, and the slogan for that campaign was, “Drugs kill!”

Josipa
It’s both tragic and funny.

Kevin
Well, the flip side of tragedy is comedy.

Josipa
And do you have a word for the opposite of deadly?

Kevin
Good, youhe quite the opposite of deadly is word gAmmin.

Gambin is wrong, Wrong, not good, joking or pretending, and sometimes even pathetic. It depends on how you use it in the context of the sentence.

Josipa
Do you have any examples?

Kevin
Yes, well, I thought I could sprint 100 meters in 10 seconds, well, I was absolutely kidding.

Josipa
Kevin, your teaching lesson was awesome, so deadly! And we learned the meaning of Native English for the words

Kevin
Mob, loaded, deadly and gammin and we’re not done. Want to hear something deadly?

[music by The Last Kinection – Black and Deadly]

It was the awesome duo of brother and sister duo, The Last Kinection. There are a lot of negative stereotypes about Indigenous people, so we like to counter that with a lot of positive talk about being proud of our blackness and that we’re mortal.


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Many thanks to Kevin Kropinyeri for making this podcast with us and to The Last Kinection for the music.

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