English grammars – Anglomir http://anglomir.net/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 11:18:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://anglomir.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-2-120x120.png English grammars – Anglomir http://anglomir.net/ 32 32 UK school children will receive at least one hour of MUSIC instruction each week | Music | Entertainment https://anglomir.net/uk-school-children-will-receive-at-least-one-hour-of-music-instruction-each-week-music-entertainment/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 11:18:34 +0000 https://anglomir.net/uk-school-children-will-receive-at-least-one-hour-of-music-instruction-each-week-music-entertainment/ Leonardo Umeh on trumpet (Photo: Julian Hamilton) More than £100million will be invested in the purchase of 200,000 new instruments as part of the long-awaited National Music Education Plan, which is finally unveiled today. With music lessons currently in crisis, the government insists pupils in primary and secondary schools will now enjoy vastly increased opportunities. […]]]>

Leonardo Umeh on trumpet (Photo: Julian Hamilton)

More than £100million will be invested in the purchase of 200,000 new instruments as part of the long-awaited National Music Education Plan, which is finally unveiled today. With music lessons currently in crisis, the government insists pupils in primary and secondary schools will now enjoy vastly increased opportunities.

The Department for Education’s decision comes after the Express revealed how the number of pupils studying GCSE music has fallen by 19% in the past 10 years across England. Level A numbers had dropped by 50%.

Geoff Taylor, Managing Director of the UK Phonographic Industry and Brit Awards, said: “We welcome the government’s renewed focus on music education, which will support the future of the UK’s leading global music sector. -United.

“We know from our experience with the Brit School that music can play a vital role in nurturing young people’s creativity, teaching them life skills and, most importantly, promoting well-being.

“We are therefore delighted to see new investments to provide musical instruments and equipment to schools.

“Our industry will continue to support a wide range of education programs to ensure the skills learned in the classroom can help young people thrive in our diverse and growing sector.

“We will carefully review the details of the plan and work with government and education partners to maximize its impact.” Schools Minister Robin Walker said: “Gaining an appreciation and understanding of music, learning to play a musical instrument and being part of a band or singing in a choir can have a profound impact on our This promotes their well-being and creativity, as well as being extremely important in itself for developing children’s interests, talents and potential.

“Music also supports students’ development in other curriculum subjects, doing wonders for their ability to remember and retain information. There are also many studies that show a strong link between teaching music and how it can improve your math skills.

“This investment will make it possible to offer subsidized lessons if necessary, so that every child who wishes can learn an instrument and play music.

“We create new programs for the most talented young musicians to prepare for a career in music and become the next Ed Sheeran, Kate Bush or Sheku Kanneh-Mason.”

Jamie Njoku-Goodwin, Chief Executive of UK Music, said: “Music is a national asset that brings billions to the economy, improves our health and wellbeing and boosts our global reputation.

“A thorough musical education also brings enormous benefits to children, whatever they do later in life, and it is in our national interest to have a music-literate society.

“Continued investment in music education is vital if we are to unlock the enormous creative potential of young people.”

Independent schools currently spend an average of five times more on music than state schools, which can spend as little as £1 per pupil per year on the subject.

In response, the government has made available new funding worth £25 million over the next four years for the purchase of 200,000 musical instruments and equipment, including instruments suitable for students with special educational needs and disabilities.

Jimmy Rotheram in class

Jimmy Rotheram in class (Photo: Julian Hamilton)

An additional £79 million will continue to be made available each year until 2025 for the Music Hubs program across the country.

Under the updated National Plan for Music Education guidelines, each school will also be required to have a designated music officer or head of department.

The plan sets the goal for each student to have at least one hour per week of music education in milestones one through three.

It will also provide teachers and young people with advice on how to progress in a music career.

The national plan also includes initiatives to further develop the teaching of instruments and music.

This will include a pilot project to improve music progression in disadvantaged areas and the roll-out of an inclusion strategy in each music hub area, so that all children and young people can benefit from high quality music education.

Last night, industry experts said they needed to read the proposals in full, but hoped the new plan would help prevent music education from having to play second fiddle to core subjects that are math, english and science in the future.

Sing the praises of a key topic

The Daily Express has launched our Strike A Chord campaign to reinstate music lessons as a key part of the national curriculum.

With the backing of an array of superstars including Def Leppard singer Joe Elliott and classical virtuoso trumpeter Alison Balsom, we’ve revealed how the world-leading UK music industry is under threat because children have stopped playing. study music in public schools.

We believe the subject should have the same priority status as math, English and science.

Feversham Primary Academy, Bradford, was subject to special measures in 2013

Top class…Bradford school excelled (Photo: Julian Hamilton)

The school of rock is on a roll

A failing school turned into one of the best in the country after putting music education at the forefront of its curriculum. Feversham Primary Academy, Bradford, faced special measures in 2013 when it began to struggle to meet its targets.

But, nearly a decade later, it is now consistently in the top 10% of schools in England for progress in children’s English and maths learning. And it all happened by focusing on music and dispelling the “myth” that English, math and science are more important subjects.

Pupils in Feversham now benefit from three hours of programmed music in their school per week. But many make up to eight hours by choosing to attend music clubs. The music lessons are all very practical and help students with all kinds of skills.

The transformation was led by Jimmy Rotheram, a previously disillusioned music teacher and pioneer school principal Naveed Idrees. The school bases its approach on the Kodaly method of learning, which involves teaching children through musical games.

This focus on creativity has improved achievement across the school, not just among musically gifted students. Mr Rotherham said the methods are ‘demonstrably more effective than drilling Sats papers’. He added: “My number one rule is that learning should always be a joy, never a torture.”

Commentary by Jamie Njoku – Goodwin, Managing Director of UK Music

Music can transform lives. The creative potential is everywhere, but not the opportunities. Thus, his vital musical education is accessible to all, regardless of their background, and is not reserved for the privileged few.

Thus, the new National Plan for Music Education, with its commitment to financial investment, is welcome.

It sets out minimum expectations for music education in schools and explains how schools, community groups and the music industry can join forces to give young people the best music education possible.

Music should be at the heart of education. Not only does it enrich the lives of children, but it also improves our health and well-being, makes an enormous social and economic contribution, and strengthens our global reputation.

This weekend the eyes of the world are on Glastonbury as big UK stars take to the stage – but many of their journeys have started in the classroom.

We need to invest in music education to help unlock the unlimited creative potential of young people.

The Daily Express’ brilliant Strike a Chord campaign has played a key role in highlighting the role of music education and ensuring it gets the support it needs.

Every child deserves a quality musical education. Today’s National Plan is an important step.

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Plans to do Medway Holcombe, Chatham Grammar and Fort Pitt co-ed grammars lambasted by former leader Peter Read https://anglomir.net/plans-to-do-medway-holcombe-chatham-grammar-and-fort-pitt-co-ed-grammars-lambasted-by-former-leader-peter-read/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://anglomir.net/plans-to-do-medway-holcombe-chatham-grammar-and-fort-pitt-co-ed-grammars-lambasted-by-former-leader-peter-read/ An education consultant has criticized plans for three single-sex high schools to become co-educational from September 2024. A consultation on the plans is due to end tomorrow (Sunday) and involves selections Medway Holcombe, for boys, and Chatham Grammar and Fort Pitt – both for girls. Holcombe Grammar School may soon be coeducational following a consultation […]]]>

An education consultant has criticized plans for three single-sex high schools to become co-educational from September 2024.

A consultation on the plans is due to end tomorrow (Sunday) and involves selections Medway Holcombe, for boys, and Chatham Grammar and Fort Pitt – both for girls.

Holcombe Grammar School may soon be coeducational following a consultation process. Photo: Chris Davey

Medway Council insists this would end an inequality in places that currently exists between boys and girls.

Currently, there are more places for girls than the Medway test — the unitary authority’s 11-plus exam to determine high school aptitude — can offer. The result being that 116 girls from outside the council’s borders fill the coveted places.

But Peter Read, a former Gravesend grammar manager who runs popular education website KentAdvice.co.uk, says the plan is flawed.

He insists that Medway’s children’s grammar offer is “comfortably correct” and that there is “no problem finding a place in a high school”. Adding: ‘To say there is a shortage of boys’ places is simply not true.’

The Medway Council is conducting the consultation on behalf of the academies that operate the schools – Beyond Schools operates Fort Pitt Grammar, Thinking Schools Holcombe Grammar and University of Kent Academies Trust Chatham Grammar – to “ensure proper and comprehensive processes are followed and ensure the transparency and fairness of the process”.

Former Gravesend head teacher Peter Read says there is no pedagogical argument for the changes to the three schools.  Photo: Peter Read
Former Gravesend head teacher Peter Read says there is no pedagogical argument for the changes to the three schools. Photo: Peter Read

Unitary authority does not assign students to schools, with the admissions process handled by the schools themselves.

But Mr Read points out that of the Year 7 students currently attending Medway grammars – all of which give priority to local children – there are still 83 boys from outside Medway.

And he fears that changing the schools’ entry requirements will mean an increase in the percentage of students deemed suitable for grammatical selection after taking the Medway test, which, in turn, will potentially have a negative impact on all selective and non-selective schools in the region. .

In an earlier paper presented to the Medway Council cabinet, he spoke of increasing grammar intake from the current 23% to a “maximum of 28%”. He added that such a move would also “relieve the pressure on non-selective schools” at Medway.

Mr Read explains: “My problem is that I can’t find any educational reason for this consultation paper to move forward.

Fort Pitt High School is one of those who want to change.  Photo: Barry Crayford
Fort Pitt High School is one of those who want to change. Photo: Barry Crayford

“It’s a pretty big shake-up. It changes the character of three schools. Not just a little, but a lot.

“The plan is to increase the pick rate of the Medway test.

“If they do it by just 3%, that means the number of kids in each high school would increase in number by 8%. That’s the low end of the capacity range. Now what’s the point of a high school ?

“For grammar, the major problem is having students who may have trouble with what is expected of them.

“The parents of the extra children who go to high school will be happy; the children who go to high school will find that the work inevitably becomes less difficult.

The consultation period opened in April - and ends this weekend
The consultation period opened in April – and ends this weekend

“For the non-selectives, they’re going to lose the top of their range of abilities. This will weaken the non-selectives and weaken the grammars.

He adds: ‘It’s pointless, it’s wasteful and it’s counterproductive – and it’s going to cost money that could be better spent building another non-selective school to ease the pressures.’

But Medway Council, which says the costs of adapting schools “will be carefully considered on an individual basis”, insists with an equal number of places for boys and girls it can then “allocate more places in secondary schools to proposed Medway students day” which, in turn, “will reduce the ability of schools to accommodate students living outside of Medway.”

He added that the proportion of pupils attending Kent and Medway grammar schools varies widely by region, with some parts of Kent he says as high as 40%. He indicates, by contrast, that Medway’s selective cohort at 23-25% is currently relatively small, adding “with the expected increase in student numbers over the next few years (it) will continue to decline if we don’t create this extra capacity in the system.”

He admits that allowing more Medway students to attend grammars will reduce some short-term pressure on non-selectives, but that increasing the number of students at Medway will “undo that”.

Medway Council Education and Schools Portfolio Holder, Cllr Martin Potter
Medway Council Education and Schools Portfolio Holder, Cllr Martin Potter

Cllr Martin Potter, Medway Council’s portfolio holder for education and schools, said: ‘We want to ensure that in future there will be enough places in secondary schools for children assessed as grammar while providing the best opportunities for children in Medway to attend Medway’s schools.I encourage residents to participate in the consultation.

Mr Read is also a long-term critic of the Medway test – a test he considers ‘unsuitable’ in that it is, he says, biased in favor of girls due to the fact that a section of the document is devoted to a single room. written English – a task at which girls at this age are traditionally better.

“As a result,” he explains, “the Medway test is biased in favor of girls.

“You could say that boys do better in math. But that’s one piece of writing. And for some reason, girls do considerably better.

“The Kent test has a math and English test that is balanced. And the results are standardized to a national standard. Boys do slightly better than girls.

A consultation with grammar heads is underway which may see changes to the Medway test.  Image: stock image
A consultation with grammar heads is underway which may see changes to the Medway test. Image: stock image

“In Medway (where the Medway test currently consists of English, math and verbal reasoning) they don’t standardize it the same way – just standardize it locally.

“In Kent you have to get a minimum score in each section (currently English, Maths, Verbal and Non-Verbal Reasoning). In Medway it’s just the total. So if you’re bad at maths but excellent at English, you walk in. So that a piece of English can dominate the whole process.”

The Medway Council says it is currently in consultation with grammar school leaders about adding a non-verbal reasoning test for 2023, adding “this will provide a more comprehensive assessment of grammar ability”.

To participate in the consultation which ends tomorrow, Click here.

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10 famous songs to learn English https://anglomir.net/10-famous-songs-to-learn-english/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 13:09:46 +0000 https://anglomir.net/10-famous-songs-to-learn-english/ Listening to songs can improve their listening skills in this language and it is known that especially when the weather is nice outside it is difficult to stay indoors and study, this way they can complete their learning even on the move. or doing other tasks. . If you want to be fluent in English, […]]]>

Listening to songs can improve their listening skills in this language and it is known that especially when the weather is nice outside it is difficult to stay indoors and study, this way they can complete their learning even on the move. or doing other tasks. . If you want to be fluent in English, listening to songs might be a better option. By doing this you will get to know more words which will increase your vocabulary skills. So, try this method at least once in your life because it is very beneficial and you will know it for yourself after trying it.

Although listening to songs can be used as an additional method of learning/improving English, check out English tutors from AmazingTalker for 1 on 1 tutoring.

Some songs that will help you learn English are-

List of 10 famous songs to learn English

1. Wake Me Up – Avicci:

Some of the lyrics – “So wake me up when it’s all over, when I’m wiser and older. All the while, I found myself and didn’t know I was lost. From these you can see the uses of certain tenses, passive voice, etc. All of these grammatical uses can help you learn English more than any other method.

2. Thinking Out Loud – Ed Sheeran:

Thinking Out Loud has distinct fanbases. If you are looking for its lyrics and benefits for learning English, you will get to know, this song is quite effective. Some people have found this extremely useful for their lesson plans and tests. Some of the lines in this song are- “when my hair is almost gone and my memory is fading.”

3. Budapest-George Ezra:

It’s a popular song and lyrically it’s a love song. Here, the narrator mentions the things he or she would give up for this person who means so much to him or her. These lyrics have love lines that will teach you love words and these can be helpful for your vocabulary.

4. Hello – Adele:

It’s a song of reconnecting with everyone and myself. It has intro type lyrics that will reconnect you with yourself and everyone else. And, there are also lyrics about yourself. From this song you will learn how you can start a conversation with anyone in English and where to use grammar or punctuation.

5. Someone You Loved – Lewis Capaldi:

“Someone to Know, Someone to Have, Someone to Hold” – those shows about someone you love or love the most. If you want to learn English through English, it can be a subject like “someone you love”, then start saying. This song will help you learn the words of lovers which will also increase your vocabulary.

6. All About Me – John Legend:

“Because all of me loves all of you, I love your curves and all of your edges, all of your imperfections.” Love for everyone is manifested here very specifically. This song grammatically uses different word usages, writing styles can help you learn English easily if you notice the lyrics correctly. Try this method and you will see the benefits.

7. Shallow – Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper:

It is about communication and also about love songs in the soul. it descends very low to its peak without stairs. This song has the context of asking a girl in this modern world if she is looking for something or if she is happy. When you listen to this, if you notice the lyrics, it will help you learn English more fluently.

8. New Rules – Dua Lipa:

The new rules have different levels of fanbase. Here you will get to know the rules and how you can also create them. Take this song as a topic of speech and then you can take help from here. This speech will help you become fluent in English and you can explore new words.

9. Do you love yourself – Justin Bieber:

It will teach you to love yourself. To love yourself, you must first know what you love. Start talking to yourself about what you like, what you deserve, etc. Find all the results in English.

10. Just as you are – Bruno Mars:

This song teaches to stay as you are or to love someone as they are. Here, the usages of punctuations, articles, and general grammars can help you know where to use what.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I learn English with songs?

Yes, you can learn English with songs. Songs can help you learn grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation. They can also help you understand the culture and improve your listening skills.

Can English songs improve English?

Some people believe that listening to songs in English can help improve English skills. There is no definitive answer because everyone learns differently and what works for one person may not work for another.

However, it is generally accepted that regular listening to a foreign language can help acquisition and retention. Additionally, many songs contain catchy melodies and simplistic lyrics, which can make them easier to remember than other types of audio material. Ultimately, whether or not English songs help improve English skills depends on the learner.

How can music teach English?

Music can teach English in many ways. Some ways include:

  1. Songs can be used to teach grammar rules and vocabulary.
  2. Songs can be used to teach different subjects, such as history or science.
  3. Songs can be used to teach children how to read and write.
  4. Songs can be used to teach children to count and do basic calculations.

Conclusion:

Now you all know how songs can help you learn English and how you can speak fluently. If you want to learn English, start with an English tutor from AmazingTalker (the No# language learning platform) and listen to English songs at the same time. Very soon you will see the magic!



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Famous faces who attended high schools in Dorset – from Hollywood stars to soap opera starlets https://anglomir.net/famous-faces-who-attended-high-schools-in-dorset-from-hollywood-stars-to-soap-opera-starlets/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 14:15:20 +0000 https://anglomir.net/famous-faces-who-attended-high-schools-in-dorset-from-hollywood-stars-to-soap-opera-starlets/ Across Britain, pupils and their parents will anxiously apply for high school places. These selective high schools trace their origins back to the Middle Ages, when they specialized in Latin and the classics. Many still teach these subjects, unlike their publicly funded counterparts, while also offering the full range of subjects required by the national […]]]>

Across Britain, pupils and their parents will anxiously apply for high school places. These selective high schools trace their origins back to the Middle Ages, when they specialized in Latin and the classics.

Many still teach these subjects, unlike their publicly funded counterparts, while also offering the full range of subjects required by the national curriculum. And unlike comprehensive schools, students must prove they are worthy of a place by passing entrance exams.

Dorset is home to several grammar schools, both single-sex and co-educational, whose alumni have excelled in areas ranging from sport to fashion and academia to politics. In fact, all of these schools are in the Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole (BCP) area, with BCP being just one of 31 local authorities outside London to host the Selective Grammars, according to the Good school guide. Scroll down for a selection of the most notable Dorset grammar school alumni.

Read more: Day ticket prices for Camp Bestival 2022 and how to get them

Cherry Marshall, model and agent

Irene Maud Pearson left Bournemouth School for Girls in 1938, aged just 15, to become a lead singer in a dance group – but could never remember the lyrics. In 1942 she met and married poet and human rights activist Emanuel Litvinoff at a ball and they were married the following year.

She chose the stage name Cherry Marshall when she started modeling for Vogue and clothing company Susan Small, holding London’s record for shortest waist. But she soon grew tired of posing for pictures and became a public relations professional, before opening a modeling school and becoming one of the most important agents of the 1960s.

In 1956, she published the book Fashion Modeling as a Career. This was followed in 1978 by her memoir The Cat-Walk and in 1986 by Primetime Woman.

Christian Bale, actor

Although best known as the savior of Gotham City and an American psychopath, Christian Bale was actually born in Wales to English parents in 1974. He attended school in Bournemouth, which he left in 16 years to become an actor. Although he had no formal dramatic training, he quickly rose from the school stage to roles on stage alongside Rowan Atkinson and on screen in Spielberg’s blockbuster Empire of the Sun.

After winning Best Performance by a Juvenile Actor from the National Board of Review of Motion Pictures, he appeared in Kenneth Branagh’s Henry V and opposite Charlton Heston in Treasure Island. After experiencing a critical and commercial plunge in the 2000s, Bale’s career rebounded when he was cast as Batman in the Dark Knight Trilogy.

Lisa Dillon, actress

Born Lisa Stawiarski in 1979, Dillon attended Bournemouth School for Girls until 1997. She gained a place to study at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and went on to perform on stage in Sheffield and London. She is best known for her work as Mary Smith in the BBC One period drama Cranford. She also starred in BBC productions Cambridge Spies, Hawking and Dirk Gently.

Mark Austin, journalist

Born in 1958, Austin attended Bournemouth School and then Highbury College in Portsmouth. Starting his career at the Bournemouth Daily Echo, he later joined the BBC as a news editor and then ITV as a sports reporter.

He covered most major sporting events, as well as the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in 1990. This foray into hard news continued with assignments in Hong Kong and South Africa, after which he covered the Bosnian crisis and the war in Kosovo.

The 2000s saw him promoted to presenter on ITV Evening News, following his coverage of the 9/11 attacks and the war in Afghanistan. He took over as chief presenter when Trevor McDonald retired in 2005 and has since moved to Sky News.

Daniel Avery, musician

After attending Bournemouth School, Avery followed his passion for music production. He worked for Little Boots and Metronomy under the name Stopmakingme until 2012 when he started using his birth name.

The debut album Drone Logic was released in 2013, followed by the second record Song for Alpha in 2018. In 2019 he tried his hand at radio, replacing Mary Anne Hobbs on BBC Radio 6 Music.

Beth Kingston, actress

Born in 1986, Kingston attended Bournemouth School for Girls. She then joined the Redroofs Film and Television School (now Redroofs School for the Performing Arts). She is best known for playing India Longford on the soap opera Hollyoaks from 2009 to 2010, when her character was killed off (only to return later as an hallucination). She also appeared on stage, in panto.

Dennis Curry, geologist

The grandson of the founder of Currys electronics, Curry studied geology at Cambridge University from 1930 to 1933. He then became manager of the family business before enlisting in the RAF, teaching pilots how to use their new radio equipment.

He continued his geological research in parallel, publishing hundreds of articles on the subject and eventually becoming president of the Association of Geologists. Curry used his family’s wealth to create an annual award for excellence in postgraduate geological research.

Richard William Palmer-Jones, musician

Born in 1947, Palmer-James is a musician and songwriter best known as a founding member of Supertramp. The Bournemouth School alumnus has also written for King Crimson and others.

Charles Gray, actor

Having attended school in Bournemouth during the Second World War, Gray became a clerk to an estate agent, but left to become an actor. Starting out on stage, he became an accomplished actor best known for his work as Blofeld in the James Bond film Diamonds Are Forever.

Sophie Rundle, actress

Born in Buckinghamshire, Rundle moved to Dorset and attended Bournemouth Girls’ School until 2006. Five years later she graduated from RADA and has been making a name for herself ever since.

Credits include Ada Thorne in BBC’s Peaky Blinders, Ann Walker in HBO’s Gentleman Jack, Vicky Budd in BBC series Bodyguard and codebreaker Lucy in ITV series The Bletchley Circle. Rundle also appeared as Labia in episodes of the British-American sitcom and as Alice’s 2017 drama Jamestown in Sky One, on the set of which she met costar Matt Stokoe.

Benny Hill, actor and comedian

Hill was born in Hampshire in 1924. Both his father and grandfather had been circus clowns, which foreshadowed his own career as a stratospheric comedian. He was formally enrolled at Taunton’s School in Southampton, but was evacuated to Bournemouth School during the Second World War.

Hill was a truck driver and projector operator, before moving to the Combined Services Entertainment division. He made a name for himself on radio, but it’s on television – particularly the 60s hit The Benny Hill Show – that the burlesque actor is best remembered.

James Grigg, politician

Born the son of a carpenter in 1890, Grigg won a scholarship to Bournemouth School and went on to study mathematics at Cambridge. He joined the civil service and worked for the Treasury, becoming chief of staff to the chancellor.

After a posting in India, he returned to Great Britain and became permanent Under-Secretary of State for War in 1939. He was promoted to Secretary of State for War by Winston Churchill, a position he retained until 1945 , date on which he loses his seat as a deputy and retires. of public life.

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Johnson’s ‘red meat’ policy proposals reveal his insecurity | Boris Johnson https://anglomir.net/johnsons-red-meat-policy-proposals-reveal-his-insecurity-boris-johnson/ Mon, 30 May 2022 17:08:00 +0000 https://anglomir.net/johnsons-red-meat-policy-proposals-reveal-his-insecurity-boris-johnson/ It’s a moment often seen in the downward trajectory of beleaguered prime ministers: a whirlwind of new policy ideas intended to please voters, but which are actually more often aimed at appeasing their own MPs. Boris Johnson is approaching, some would say, that point. In recent days, Downing Street has come out in favor of […]]]>

It’s a moment often seen in the downward trajectory of beleaguered prime ministers: a whirlwind of new policy ideas intended to please voters, but which are actually more often aimed at appeasing their own MPs. Boris Johnson is approaching, some would say, that point.

In recent days, Downing Street has come out in favor of high schools and imperial measures. The previous weeks have seen forays into other Tory comfort zones, including bashing the EU and talking about fossil fuels.

Such nostalgia politics are regularly promoted by Conservative backbenchers. But it is one of the paradoxes of Conservative party politics that the more secure a prime minister is in power, the less he has to indulge in these ideas.

One reason is obvious: a popular prime minister with broad support need not court smaller groups with niche interests. More generally, for all their in-party currency, there is not much evidence that such “red meat” policies are particularly popular with voters – at least those beyond the conservative core.

High schools are a fascinating example. Beloved by many Tory MPs, including Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the 1922 Conservative backbench committee, their supporters see the massive rollout of selective education as a solution to leveling and a clear winner in the vote.

The front-page article in Monday’s Daily Telegraph, a longtime proponent of grammars, said senior ministers were ‘open’ to remove the ban on new selective public schools, but met with resistance from officials.

There’s probably a reason for the resistance from officials: decades of research showing no evidence that grammars help with social mobility, middle-class parents routinely using tutoring for Game 11+ exams while poorer children disproportionately end up in less academic schools.

Polls show they are also a extremely controversial issue, with an almost equal split between supporting the expansion of high schools, maintaining the current mix or eliminating them altogether. Another poll show parents are much less inclined to support the system if they think their child will not reach the school threshold.

Hydraulic fracturing is broadly analogous in political terms: popular with usually vocal backbenchers, pushing ministers to offer political concessions, but notably harder to sell to the public.

While many voters like the idea of ​​abundant shale gas, they are inevitably less enthusiastic if the process is happening near them. When the Guardian contacted the 138 MPs with fracking exploration licenses in their constituencies to ask if they supported local mining, only five said yes.

The imperial measures are a less contentious issue with loyal Tories, though it is largely met with a baffled shrug by everyone. It was, inevitably, also the Telegraph who was informed about the idea of ​​”bringing back” the imperial system, a slightly confusing notion given that the UK has for decades used a mixture of imperial and metric, depending on the circumstances.

Addressing the idea on Monday, Johnson’s spokesman insisted that Imperial units were “universally understood”. Vote show something very different – that most people use a mix, but the younger a person the more likely they are to use the metric primarily.

Suggesting policies that primarily appeal to your base vote is, of course, nothing new, but it’s only ever part of a successful political strategy.

At a recent Conservative election strategy meeting, party chairman Oliver Dowden outlined his “80/20” strategy, intended to defend 80 marginal seats already held and win 20 more. It’s a bold plan, but one that would likely require imaginative policy proposals.

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And yet the bulk of recent political ideas seem to be based on what is, for Tory MPs, happy and familiar ground. None are happier and more familiar than Brexit, hence the EU’s recent attempts to challenge the Northern Ireland protocol and the long-promised “bonfire” of Brussels regulations.

Brexit arguably epitomizes Johnson’s current political stasis. He delivered the 2019 election, but opposition parties barely mention him and most voters pay little attention to him. This is yet another issue where the Conservative Party risks trying to reach out to voters only to find it is largely talking to itself.

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The myth of Akbar – the ‘Great’ | OPINION https://anglomir.net/the-myth-of-akbar-the-great-opinion/ Thu, 19 May 2022 03:57:22 +0000 https://anglomir.net/the-myth-of-akbar-the-great-opinion/ When we read the medieval history of India, historians tell us that Akbar who established the great Mughal Empire in India was a great ruler. He is nicknamed “the Great” by these “eminent” historians. According to them, he was the greatest among all Mughal emperors. He had a great personality, his political and military achievements […]]]>

When we read the medieval history of India, historians tell us that Akbar who established the great Mughal Empire in India was a great ruler. He is nicknamed “the Great” by these “eminent” historians. According to them, he was the greatest among all Mughal emperors. He had a great personality, his political and military achievements were unmatched. The kingdom’s religious policy which he adopted towards people of other faiths, especially Hindus, was liberal, accommodating and tolerant, thus qualifying him to be called “the Great”.

According to historians, Akbar is “great” with many achievements like undefeated military campaigns, establishment and consolidation of Mughal rule in the Indian subcontinent with its historical extent and spread, relative prosperity of his rule and the establishment of administrative measures, which have been copied. until the 19th century, etc. His personality was great, for he had many virtues. Although he was Muslim, his empire was never Islamic. He married many Hindu princesses and was a very tolerant person. The epithet “great” is also given to Akbar based on his tolerant, secular, and liberal state policy. Thus, he is the perfect example of the national king.

He assimilated Indian culture and promoted the idea of ​​’Sulehkul’. Although he is the descendant of Babur, he made India his homeland and was therefore ‘Indianized’. Describing Akbar’s success as “astonishing”, Jawaharlal Nehru, the historian, concludes that Akbar “created a sense of unity among the various elements of northern and central India”. It is important to mention here that an aura of grandeur has been created around Emperor Akbar which has been further romanticized, by a few films in Bollywood where Akbar is presented as a perfect king; thus creating a popular myth around him.

In a nutshell, Akbar is hailed as “great” by these historians because of three major parameters: a) his traits, b) his achievements as an emperor, c) his liberal, secular, and accommodating religious policies toward other religions. , especially the Hindus. A narrative has been established by a few historians to project Akbar as an example of a perfect ruler who made no distinction on the basis of religion towards people of other religions when making and executing policy of State. Thus, Akbar’s religious policy was overemphasized and overemphasized to conclude that he was “the Great”.

We will discuss these three aspects with historical evidence and facts, and regardless of the narrative instructed by these historians to come to the conclusions regarding the “greatness” of the Mughal Emperor.

The story of Akbar, “the Great”, was seeded by Anglican historians, which was later developed by Nehruvian and left-wing historians. Enchanted by the power of their own British Empire, these British historians have overestimated the grandeur, splendor and political-territorial spread of Akbar’s empire, associated with the fact that he established the Mughal Empire. To make an outside invader who conquered India through the use of ruthless force in the name of religion and who established and consolidated the Mughal Empire as the British established their own, suited the account of historians Whiteman in justifying their colonialism and foreign domination with a centralized system of power imposed on Hindustan.

On merit too, Akbar’s empire was not as big as other empires in India. If we compare the political territory and extent of the Mughal Empire under Akbar, it was much less than his successors like Aurangzeb and much less than the Maurya Empire, Maratha Empire and the British Raj and even less than the empire Gupta, as we can see. seen from the following table.

So to say that his empire was big is totally wrong, concocting and distorting the real historical facts and evidence just to support the biased view of Akbar’s Mughal kingdom being vast in terms of territory.

The second argument vehemently advanced by Nehruvian-leftist historians is that Akbar was an Indian since he was born, raised and died here as an Indian. He made India his homeland and, unlike the British, did not take the country’s wealth to his own land.

Nothing is far from historical evidence and facts. He was the grandson of the acclaimed invader Babur, who invaded India to plunder and plunder its riches. He followed the Islamist religious duty to kill the infidels, destroy their temples and convert the kafirs to Islam.

Even his father Hamayun could not establish a proper regime in India and never made India his homeland although he died there. According to historical accounts [Chandra, Satish (2001) Medieval India and Smith, Vincent Arthur (1917)], Akbar and his guardian, Bairam Khan, were in Kalanaur (Batala, Punjab) on their way back to Kabul for good when they heard the news of Humayun’s death. It was not by choice that Akbar stayed in India and made it his homeland, but by historical circumstances, which forced him to fight and stay in the country.

The historical events that unfolded led him to fight the Second Battle of Panipat (1526) which he won without fighting himself. This war was fought on religious lines with a call to convert India into an Islamic state because after defeating and beheading Hemachandra Vikramaditya (Hemu) in the second battle of Panipat, Akbar assumed the title of ‘Ghazi’ . He sent Hemu’s head to Kabul for display and had the trunk kept at one of the Delhi gates (p 29 V. Smith).

The “most tolerant” Mughal emperor had built a tower made of the heads of soldiers killed after winning this bloody war. Thus, a foreign invader, whose father and grandfather invaded and plundered India, is called “the Great” for defeating an Indian ruler and establishing a Mughal empire. It’s a parody of logic. According to this logic, even the English were also great.

The other dominant narrative woven by these “prominent” historians is that he was very tolerant of other religions. He was the most liberal, tolerant and least radical of all Mughal kings. Even though Akbar fought with Indian rulers, it was never on the basis of religion. His state policy did not single out a person on a religious basis. Nothing could be further from the facts. Imagine the level of distortion, fiction and myth created by those devotees of the great Mughals who wanted to read the past from the perspective of the present.

Interestingly, their case is not that Akbar did not kill innocent Hindus in the name of Islam or wage wars in the name of Islam against infidels, but that he was the least radical of all Mughals, especially the fanatical Aurangzeb.

None of these historians have ever refuted that Akbar slaughtered innocent people after conquering Chittor. Among the Mughals, Akbar destroyed fewer temples, making him “great”. So their story is that since Akbar killed fewer Hindus, he was therefore the best of the worst!

In his seminal book – The Great Mughal – Ira Mukhoty describes that in 1568 Akbar had captured the fort of Chittorgarh after a prolonged siege. After winning the battle, Akbar ordered a cold-blooded massacre of 40,000 innocent Hindus who were unarmed civilians, mostly peasants, and who had taken refuge in the fort in what she calls a “political aberrant scorched earth”. She further says that Chittor’s defeat was proclaimed to be Islam’s victory over the infidels and Akbar said he was “occupied in jihad”. Several temples were destroyed and hundreds of ordinary women in the city who could not commit Jauhar (a Hindu practice of mass self-immolation by women in the past) were captured.

According to James Todd, the famous oriental historian and scholar, “the tolerant Islamist Akbar” measured the “slain” by weighing their janeu (sacred thread). After sacking Chittor, the weight of the janeus was 74.5 mann (1 Mann = 40 kg). He further says – even if I only count the atrocities committed by Akbar, it will be a challenge to keep an account of all of them, for the record, the weight of a janeu is about 7 grammars.

Also, it is claimed that he married many Indian Rajput royal ladies which shows his secular credentials. But if we go by historical records, all marriages were for political reasons more than for any sense of secular or liberal attitude. It is common knowledge that Akbar had forcibly married Salima Sultana Begum, who was the wife of his regent, Bairam Khan. Vincent Smith in ‘Akbar-The Great Mogul’ (p 81) writes, “Akbar possessed an inordinate desire for women.” One of Akbar’s motives during his wars of aggression against various rulers was to appropriate their wives, daughters and sisters. He was the one who started Meena Bazar to get concubines for his harem.

Akbar was first a Muslim, then a king. His call for war was Islamic, the titles he got after defeating were Islamic. There is not even a single instance or proof that he destroyed even a single mosque after defeating a Muslim ruler! He used to send abundant money to Makkah on various occasions from the spoils of war.

It is claimed that he removed Jazia, which shows that he was tolerant. In fact, Jazia was taken down temporarily and that takedown was also not executed correctly. In 1582, Mughal Emperor Akbar banned Sati, but no one wondered if he banned the burqa or opened mosques for Muslim women? India’s most powerful Mughal ruler, Akbar – who in 1578 ensured that he was called Ghazi – chose to build the Illahabas fort which would later be called Allahabad.

It is also claimed that he enabled the construction and repair of Hindu temples. But the fact that the holy cities of Prayag and Benares, writes Vincent Smith (p 58), were plundered and destroyed by Akbar has been conveniently minimized. Monserrate, a contemporary of Akbar, writes (p 27), “The religious zeal of the Muslims has destroyed all the temples of idols which were once numerous. In place of the Hindu temples, countless tombs and small shrines have been erected .” Akbar destroyed several temples in the Indian subcontinent, but because he destroyed fewer temples than his successor Aurangzeb, he was “the Great”?

We need to revisit those rosy images of a foreign Muslim bigot making a rule and giving him the title “great”. This story of Akbar, the great, must be unwired and unmasked.

(This article is written by Rajiv Tuli, author and commentator. All views are personal.)

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UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE Literacy and Language Teaching Teacher Job https://anglomir.net/university-of-melbourne-literacy-and-language-teaching-teacher-job/ Fri, 13 May 2022 06:33:45 +0000 https://anglomir.net/university-of-melbourne-literacy-and-language-teaching-teacher-job/ Location: Parcville Role type: Full time; Continue Department/School: Melbourne Graduate School of Education Salary: Level E – $204,320 per year plus 17% super Founded in 1853, the University of Melbourne is Australia’s No. 1 university and is consistently ranked among the top universities in the world. We are proud of our staff, our commitment […]]]>

Location: Parcville

Role type: Full time; Continue

Department/School: Melbourne Graduate School of Education

Salary: Level E – $204,320 per year plus 17% super

Founded in 1853, the University of Melbourne is Australia’s No. 1 university and is consistently ranked among the top universities in the world. We are proud of our staff, our commitment to excellence in research and teaching, and our global engagement.

About the Melbourne Graduate School of Education

The Melbourne Graduate School of Education (MGSE) fosters staff productivity, growth and engagement in a collective effort to enrich education’s contribution to society. We conduct research and teaching that leads to the transformation of the practice of education both within and beyond the profession. MGSE stimulates learning that enriches the potential of students around the world, enabling meaningful careers and profound contributions to communities.

We provide research leadership, setting the direction for high-impact, innovative and responsive research that addresses the pressing issues of our time. We lead a deliberate engagement with society, sharing our resources and expertise in collaborative efforts to build a resilient, equitable and sustainable future.

For more information about us, visit: https://education.unimelb.edu.au/

About the role

The Professor of Literacy and Language Education at the University of Melbourne is in a unique position to shape the future of literacy and language teaching and research in Australia and abroad. They will have an international reputation in the field of literacy and language teaching, with a specialization in the field of English as a first or additional language, or in languages ​​other than English. The person appointed to this position will have an exceptional research track record, including a demonstrated ability to attract substantial research funds, and will have proven leadership qualities to foster excellence in research among colleagues.

Additionally, the faculty position will be the recipient of large competitive research grants, have a substantial publication record, and successfully supervise graduate research students. The literacy and language teacher will also have outstanding professional experience in teaching and learning, including recognized leadership in literacy and language teaching and learning. The position will provide leadership in curriculum, curriculum development and student support, ensuring a high quality student experience. As an experienced academic leader, the Professor will report to the Dean and have the vision and ability to help shape and build the Melbourne Graduate School of Education and the university.

The Literacy and Languages ​​Professor provides academic leadership and strategic direction to the Literacy and Language Education (LALE) sister group at the Melbourne Graduate School of Education. The group’s work spans research, teaching and engagement in: literacy and language pedagogies; policies and curricula; education and teacher training; grammars and literary knowledge; and emerging literacies and pluriliteracies associated with diversity, mobility and the pervasiveness of new technologies and social media.

In addition to leading the LALE group, the Literacy and Language Teacher will also be expected to play a leading role on MGSE and University committees, and in promoting literacy and the teaching of languages ​​in public forums outside the university, both nationally and internationally. They will build relationships with professional associations, government and community organizations supporting literacy and language education.

About you

Superior communication and stakeholder management skills, with the ability to identify opportunities for collaboration and attract funding grants, facilitate communication between MGSE and key collaborators (such as industry, community , policymakers, government, and academic peers), and the ability to motivate, persuade, and negotiate with these organizations.

Ideally, you will also have:

  • A relevant doctoral degree.
  • Recognition as an eminent authority in the field of literacies and languages, with an outstanding internationally recognized record of innovative research and scholarship demonstrated by a strong publication record in leading international journals, research manuscripts, conference presentations, etc.
  • A distinguished career in teaching and a commitment to literacy and language teaching.
  • Demonstrated knowledge and understanding of international and national policy environments in education, with demonstrated ability to research and analyze global trends, and policy initiatives taken to address them.
  • Experience in bridging traditional disciplines and leading interdisciplinary collaborations related to literacy and languages, with a demonstrated ability to build networks effectively within the University and schools.
  • Proven people management skills and demonstrated ability to motivate and lead colleagues to grow and work collaboratively and effectively within a team, managing existing resources to the maximum while building capacity for the future ; and
  • Proof of ability to work in the transformation of digital spaces, for research and education.

To ensure that the University continues to provide a safe environment for all, this position requires the incumbent to hold an up-to-date and valid working with children verification.

Benefits of working with us

In addition to having the opportunity to grow and meet challenges, and to be part of a vibrant campus life, our employees enjoy a range of rewarding benefits:

  • Flexible work arrangements and generous personal, parental and cultural leaves
  • Competitive remuneration, 17% super, salary package and leave loading
  • Free and subsidized health and wellness services, and access to fitness and cultural clubs
  • Discounts on a wide range of products and services, including Myki and Qantas Club cards
  • Career development opportunities and 25% off graduate courses for staff and their immediate families

To learn more, please visit https://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/staff-benefits.

Be yourself

At UoM, we value the unique backgrounds, experiences and contributions each person brings to our community, and we encourage and celebrate diversity. Indigenous Australians, those who identify as LGBTQIA+, women, people of all ages with disabilities and from diverse cultures are encouraged to apply for our roles. Our goal is to create a workforce that reflects the community in which we live.

Join us!

If you think this role is right for you, please submit your application, including a brief cover letter, your resume, and your responses to the selection criteria^ (found in the job description) for the role.

For information to help you compile short statements to meet the selection criteria and competencies, please see http://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/selection-criteria

If you require reasonable adjustments with the recruitment process, please contact the Talent Acquisition team at hr-talent@unimelb.edu.au.

The University of Melbourne is required to comply with applicable health guidelines and directives issued by the Victorian Minister of Health. The University of Melbourne requires all University of Melbourne employees to be fully immunized against COVID-19 unless an exemption order applies. All applicants must therefore meet this requirement when submitting an application.

Job Description : Job Description Literacy and Language Teacher 2022.05.06.pdf

Closing of applications: June 9, 2022 11:55 PM AUS Eastern Standard Time

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Michael Sheen at Cheltenham: 13 reasons the Welsh think he’s lush https://anglomir.net/michael-sheen-at-cheltenham-13-reasons-the-welsh-think-hes-lush/ Fri, 06 May 2022 19:40:08 +0000 https://anglomir.net/michael-sheen-at-cheltenham-13-reasons-the-welsh-think-hes-lush/ They are less than 100 miles away but in terms of image Cheltenham and Port Talbot could be light years away. But this week the towns are linked by the arrival of Michael Sheen in the spa town famous for its stunning architecture, Cotswold countryside and fine cultural festivals. The 53-year-old actor traveled to Cheltenham […]]]>

They are less than 100 miles away but in terms of image Cheltenham and Port Talbot could be light years away. But this week the towns are linked by the arrival of Michael Sheen in the spa town famous for its stunning architecture, Cotswold countryside and fine cultural festivals.

The 53-year-old actor traveled to Cheltenham to film a new four-part BBC drama, Best Interests, at venues including Home and Botanic, on St George’s Road, All Saints Church and the Promenade.

It’s a far cry from the Welsh industrial town it calls home, where steelworks dominate the skyline as holidaymakers zoom by on the M4 en route to West Wales.

But do you know that Michael Sheen is not just any Hollywood actor? In Wales, he is considered a bona fide hero. A superstar adored by all. And that’s why Wales think Michael Sheen is lush and not just any old luvvie.

READ MORE: Film crews in Cheltenham shoot new BBC drama starring Michael Sheen and Sharon Horgan

He was born there

Fairly obvious but the Welsh are very picky about this particular point. He was actually born a short distance from Gloucestershire in Newport, but eventually moved to Port Talbot when he was eight. He was offered a trial with Arsenal but apparently his family didn’t want to move to London so he never went.

He’s a kid comp done well

While Gloucestershire is proud of its grammars, Wales is proud of the fact that it became comprehensive from the start. Sheen attended the local Glan Afan Comprehensive School and completed A Levels in English, Drama and Sociology at Neath Port Talbot College. From there it is the local youth theatres, Bristol Old Vic, Rada and finally Hollywood.

He is very talented

In his second year at RADA, he was so good that he landed a stage role opposite Vanessa Redgrave in When She Danced. After that, Sheen won acclaim for his numerous theatrical productions and rose to fame when he revived “Amadeus” on Broadway in 1999. He caught Hollywood’s attention by brilliantly transforming into Tony Blair in The Queen, in David Frost in Frost/Nixon and as football manager Brian Clough in The Damned United. His credits are too numerous to mention.

He surrendered his OBE

Sheen is a Welsh nationalist and in 2020 told Owen Jones he had ‘surrendered’ his OBE after researching a lecture on Wales-British state relations. He said: “I meant no disrespect, but I just realized I would be a hypocrite if I said what I was going to say at the conference about the nature of the relationship between Wales and England. British state.” Yet he remains friends with senior royals such as Camilla who support similar good causes.

So far he’s been fairly scandal-free

He met actress Kate Beckinsdale in 1995 during a touring production of The Seagull and four years later they had a daughter, Lily. She met her current husband Len Wiseman on the set of Underworld, the 2003 film in which Sheen also appeared. Despite this, they are still friends and she said, “I really like him and I like him and we make each other scream with laughter.” The only stain on his notebook seems to be hitting one of the co-stars. of Kate who yelled at her on set. “The truth is, he’s never hit anyone before in his life and it was kind of shocking,” she said of the incident. He also had relationships with English ballet dancer Lorraine Stewart, Canadian actress Rachel McAdams and American comedian Sarah Silverman. He previously opened up about how he tried to impress his eldest daughter by appearing on Twilight.

He is not vain

You rarely see Sheen dressed as a dinner dog. During lockdown, he appeared with a huge, bushy beard and didn’t seem to care about clothes. He told James Corden he was a “pioneer” in leaving his beard bushy rather than cleanly trimmed and even collected the Beard of the Year gong from the Beard Liberation Front. Although not traditionally handsome, his twinkling eyes have won him success on the romantic front and TV appearances suggest he doesn’t take his image too seriously.

He came home

Even the people of Port Talbot would agree that it’s an ugly town. Still, Sheen was a Hollywood star when he decided to put on an impassioned play in his hometown on Easter weekend 2011. Instead of sunbathing in California, he got baptized on the beach in ‘Aberavon, ate a “last supper” of beer and sandwiches at a social club while watching the Manic Street Preachers and was crucified. The epic 72-hour theater experience at Port Talbot locations put the city on the global map by broadcasting it around the world.

He stayed

After returning home for the play, he decided to stay in the city which also produced Anthony Hopkins and Richard Burton after befriending people from groups such as the one supporting young carers. When he returned three months later, they had left because funding had dried up. He said: “I realized that the difference between this child’s life being a little better or not was ultimately a small amount of funding and I wanted to help these people. I didn’t just want to be a patron or a voice of support, I actually wanted to do more than that. That’s when I thought I had to move back to Wales.

He is anti-Wonga and other payday loans

The actor realized that debt was a huge problem, so he started supporting credit unions. In addition to practically helping local credit unions, he campaigns on issues related to debt and poverty. In 2017, he founded the End High Cost Credit Alliance, which works to promote more affordable ways to borrow money.

But that’s not all

The list of good causes he actively supports is endless. By sponsoring the local women’s soccer team and paying scholarships for local children to go to college, he put his name to many charities. As Honorary Chairman of the Wales Council for Voluntary Action, he plays an active role in supporting the community. It’s really too much to mention.



Hollywood actor Michael Sheen in Cardiff to launch the Homeless Football World Cup,

He puts his money where his mouth is

Celebrities love to talk about their good deeds, but Sheen actually put her money where her mouth is. For example, when funding for the £2m Homeless World Cup in Cardiff failed at the last moment, he sold his homes in the UK and America to make it happen. He told the Big Issue: “I had to make a decision – I could walk away from it and it wouldn’t happen. I thought, I wasn’t going to let this happen. So I put my all into it. money to keep it Go.

“I had a house in America and a house here and I set them up and did whatever it took. It was scary and incredibly stressful. I’m going to pay for this for a long time. But when I got out on the other hand, i realized that i could do this stuff and, if i can keep making money, it’s not going to ruin me.

And keep doing it

While other Hollywood stars are making millions, he’s turned himself into a non-profit social enterprise so he can continue to use the money he makes from acting to fund more projects. He told the Big Issue it was because of his experiences with the Passion and Homeless World Cup and said: “There was something quite freeing about saying, ‘Okay, I’m going to invest a lot of money. money in this or that, because I can earn it again.”



Anna Lundberg and Michael Sheen attend the premiere of Universal Pictures'
Anna Lundberg and Michael Sheen attend Universal Pictures’ ‘Dolittle’ premiere

Everyone likes to see it on Gogglebox

The actor has appeared in celebrity episodes from the couch of his Baglan home which he shares with Swedish actress Anna Lundberg. The couple’s daughter, Lyra, was born on September 23, 2019, and in March this year the couple announced via social media that they were expecting their second child together. Everyone said how relaxed and down to earth they were when they appeared on the 2021 Gogglebox Celebrity special for Stand Up to Cancer, during lockdown, he and David Tennant and their wives Anna and Georgia did a BBC show called Staged. In January 2021, she said: And Michael’s luxury just at home has truly been amazing and Lyra has certainly loved it. Otherwise, Michael is still going in and out and now you really could be fully here. We were able to connect as a family, and this routine kept us sane.”

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Stephen Toope destroys Cambridge https://anglomir.net/stephen-toope-destroys-cambridge/ Thu, 05 May 2022 17:34:00 +0000 https://anglomir.net/stephen-toope-destroys-cambridge/ You can say Cambridge University is not a meritocracy. If that were the case, Stephen Toope would never have become vice-chancellor. Filled with the post in 2017, the Canadian lawyer and human rights expert has spent his controversial tenure eroding 800 years of academic freedom and educational excellence in what looks, at least in the […]]]>

You can say Cambridge University is not a meritocracy. If that were the case, Stephen Toope would never have become vice-chancellor. Filled with the post in 2017, the Canadian lawyer and human rights expert has spent his controversial tenure eroding 800 years of academic freedom and educational excellence in what looks, at least in the eyes of this former student, to an attempt to transform the British crown jewels. education in a plastic tiara from Claire’s Accessories.

Canada is the most woke country in the world. Much to the horror of many dons, Toope has imported his left-right thinking into what was once the natural homeland of the Maverick. In 2020, the university proposed new rules that would require scholars to be “respectful of the diversity of identities of others”. A valiant group of lecturers fought back, insisting Cambridge could not demand that they be respectful of all beliefs. “We have the right, in some cases practically the duty, to satirize and make fun of them,” they said.

Luckily, Toope leaves college in September, but not before a final attempt to punish the children of his own graduates who have risen by their brains and hard work. Not content to warn independent schools (many with disadvantaged children on scholarships) that their admission would decline over time, he said Cambridge may even introduce figures on high school recruitment and school meal eligibility free because, as one report summarizing its view put it, “focusing on admission to public schools alone was not an effective indicator of wealth or social class”.

So Rosie and Matt, bright kids from the suburban semis, work hard to get into grammar. Their parents sacrifice holidays and treats in order to afford tutoring for 11+ that Rosie and Matt’s Ofsted ‘inadequate’ primary school couldn’t provide. Thriving in this unapologetic college high school environment, Rosie and Matt achieve perfect GCSEs and stellar A-levels. Brimming with hope, they aim for the glittering price of a place at Cambridge. Like me at their age, they have no idea which college is which, so they choose the nicest on the river. Nooo! Don’t choose that one guys, it’s really hard to get into.

Rosie and Matt are exactly what Cambridge is looking for. Or was. They don’t suspect their applications will fail because some bleeding-heart Canadians think they’re too privileged because they weren’t born to a pit bull-owning single mother on welfare and can afford their own school lunch. .

When I moved up to Cambridge in 1978, I was one of a handful of comprehensive school students at my college, and the only one who read English. Things had to change. Before most grammars were abolished, Oxbridge was full of children from my background. Far from creating the promised level playing field, the entire system deprived the most intellectually capable children of the rigorous learning they would need to compete with their more affluent peers. By the time I got there, diversity had declined sharply and representation in public schools was at a level not seen since the war. What a magnificent goal against his camp for socialism!

A campaign to have Cambridge more accurately reflect society worked. Public school students made up 72% of its enrollment last September. In private, some professors will tell you that things have gone too far. Exceptional applicants are rejected because their parents could afford to send them to a great school. Weaker candidates who fit the new criteria are coming in and needing help. One college I know is quietly circumventing Toope’s edict by recruiting its undergraduate students from the best schools in Germany and Scandinavia; no social deprivation checkbox required!

If this class warfare of elite pedagogues against selective and private schools continues, Cambridge will begin to tumble in international rankings. How would it make sense to reject a gifted boy like, say, Greg Winter because he didn’t attend a sink competition? Greg studied natural sciences at Trinity College, being part of that extraordinary generation of the 1950s that became a great engine of achievement and upward mobility for our nation. In 2018, Sir Gregory Winter received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work on the therapeutic use of monoclonal antibodies.

You know, I can’t help but wonder if Cambridge would admit a young Greg today? Or would he do as Toope suggests and reject a ‘privileged’ product of the Royal Grammar School, Newcastle upon Tyne, in favor of someone less intelligent and more diverse? For my alma mater, the best university in the world, this is so incredibly stupid.


No more porn shame

After the humiliation of Neil “I was looking for tractors” Parish, many people, including me, revealed their own unintentional stumbling in explicit material. No less than historian and TV presenter Mary Beard says she was ‘shocked’ to be directed to a porn site while scouring the internet for Titian’s portraits of Caesar, but she ‘left. pronto”. Oh come on, Mary, as a famous classic, you must have seen some pretty priapic activity. The Romans basically ran Porn Hub 400AD.

Of all the embarrassing stories I’ve received, my favorite comes from a reader named George: “Allison, you have my sympathy for accessing unexpected porn results. Before our first canal boat holiday, I googled Canal Cruising in Wales. Or at least I thought I had.

“Note to self, check that the first letter of Canal is there. Otherwise, expect a very different holiday!”

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I want to take HRT again at 71 to avoid dementia! written JENNI MURRAY https://anglomir.net/i-want-to-take-hrt-again-at-71-to-avoid-dementia-written-jenni-murray/ Wed, 04 May 2022 22:17:49 +0000 https://anglomir.net/i-want-to-take-hrt-again-at-71-to-avoid-dementia-written-jenni-murray/ For so many years I was afraid of HRT and often warned others to be very careful before taking it. I was sitting in front of my breast cancer consultant in 2006 when I heard the words, “Are you taking HRT? “Yes,” I replied, “I’ve been taking it for ten years.” I was 46 and […]]]>

For so many years I was afraid of HRT and often warned others to be very careful before taking it. I was sitting in front of my breast cancer consultant in 2006 when I heard the words, “Are you taking HRT? “Yes,” I replied, “I’ve been taking it for ten years.” I was 46 and in perimenopause when I started.

“Stop that,” he said immediately. “Your cancer is an estrogen receptor, so it’s not safe for you to take it.”

I am now 71 and have read all about the research described in Davina McCall’s latest documentary: Sex, Mind And The Menopause which aired on Channel 4 earlier this week.

Most interesting is the link that has been found between HRT and the prevention of diseases that scare my age group the most: Alzheimer’s disease, dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s disease.

Jenni Murray urges women to think about breast cancer risks with HRT. Jenni explores the links between HRT and the prevention of the diseases that scare her age group the most: Alzheimer’s, dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s disease

Research in the United States has shown that women who took HRT for six years or more were 79% less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease and 77% less likely to develop dementia, multiple sclerosis and the disease. Parkinson’s – the disease that destroyed the last years of my life. his mother’s life and caused her death at the age of 80.

Alright, I thought, maybe it’s not too late for me to go back to the medicine that had stopped the hot flashes, made my skin feel fresh and healthy, my hair thick and shiny, and had me bouncing back with a endless energy.

I was not, of course, going to insist on a prescription without doing my own research. Studies such as the one above, conducted on nearly 400,000 American women, cannot be completely trusted. Perhaps the women who had been able to afford HRT on the expensive US health service were well off, well fed and healthy.

Likewise, I never fully trusted research programs such as those conducted in New York and Arizona that argued that the menopausal brain might be better protected if HRT was prescribed earlier than common practice. I would like to know exactly who funded the research. Could the pharmaceutical companies have been involved, seeing huge profits to be made if every woman went crazy on HRT?

First, I spoke to the Mail’s brilliant generalist columnist Dr Martin Scurr, whose experience made him rather passionate about HRT as he saw the improvements in the lives of many of his patients. He saw no reason why a 70-year-old woman should be denied the drug and reminded me that Barbara Cartland did extremely well until her death at the age of 98.

According to him, age shouldn’t be an obstacle, but… breast cancer? Since 16 years have passed since my mastectomy without a recurrence, he thought it might be safe, but I would have to talk to my own doctor first.

Jenni (pictured) spoke to a number of health experts who said women over 70 had done well with HRT drugs  But Menopause Matters founder Heather Currie said there was not strong enough evidence to recommend taking her to a dementia ward.

Jenni (pictured) spoke to a number of health experts who said women over 70 had done well with HRT drugs But Menopause Matters founder Heather Currie said there was not strong enough evidence to recommend taking her to a dementia ward.

My own GP was unavailable (surprise, surprise!) so I contacted gynecologist and founder of Menopause Matters, Heather Currie. His analysis was that starting HRT early may be beneficial for Alzheimer’s disease, but the evidence is not strong enough to recommend taking HRT for this reason alone.

“The indications for taking HRT remain the same as before… symptoms due to early menopause or premature ovarian failure or for the treatment or prevention of osteoporosis. Also, it’s always controversial to take HRT after breast cancer,” she told me.

Third, I called Professor Nigel Bundred, the surgeon who had cared for me during my diagnosis, mastectomy and subsequent treatment for breast cancer. His view was that I should stay away from estrogen-only HRT as I still had my uterus. Even though I had been breast cancer free for years, there was a significant risk of endometrial cancer.

Combination HRT patches may be acceptable, but still carry risks. He didn’t encourage me to take the easy way out and protect my brain by popping a pill or a patch. “If I remember correctly,” he said, “there is absolutely nothing wrong with your brain and the best way for you to fight Alzheimer’s disease is to carry on as you are.”

“Maintain the weight, avoid too much red meat, try fasting once in a while on a low calorie diet and make sure to exercise. More importantly, keep the brain active. Use it, don’t lose it. There’s nothing against older women taking HRT, but not if breast cancer has been in the picture. No need to start all over again.

He is right. Maybe having taken HRT for ten years before cancer gave my brain a chance to be protected, but to discount the risk that the drug is linked to breast cancer is ridiculous and potentially dangerous.

There is no doubt that there should be no age limit for prescribing HRT. Baby boomers who feel they would benefit should discuss their case with their doctor.

But please think carefully. A mastectomy is no fun at all. So, this is me taking good old-fashioned doctor advice: diet, exercise, and keeping the brain going. Crossed fingers.

TV needs the queen of badness

Jenni says she understands why Anne Robinson, 77 (pictured), is looking forward to spending time in New York and with her grandchildren after leaving Countdown

Jenni says she understands why Anne Robinson, 77 (pictured), is looking forward to spending time in New York and with her grandchildren after leaving Countdown

I’m sorry to see that Anne Robinson is leaving Countdown after only one year. I love the Queen of Mean very much, but I can understand that at 77 she is looking forward to spending time in her apartment in New York and in the garden with her grandchildren. She is right, there should be older presenters. The men seem to survive on screen. Why can’t we see women who look like us on television; not stuck at home, gray with knitting needles and a cup of tea?

deputies? A ton of totally rotten apples

At least 56 MPs face allegations of sexual misconduct. It was nicknamed Pestminster, but Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng denied a culture of misogyny and said it was just a few “bad apples”. I think we’ve all heard that before.

Cressida Dick’s strength, the Met, logged 530 allegations between 2016 and 2020. The occasional ‘bad’ one was how she saw it. Parliament and the police – the men we should be able to trust. It’s not just “bad” or “a few”, it’s a ton of totally rotten apples.

  • I will always be grateful for the intellectual rigor of my school, Barnsley Girls’ High in Yorkshire. The school unfortunately no longer exists and, says MP Jonathan Gullis, there is not a single grammar in the North East. To level up, you have to reintroduce grammars to give each child a chance.

When my refugees met my Russian neighbor

Jenni with Zoryana and Ustym.  Jenni was nervous about Ukrainian refugee mother and son meeting her Russian neighbor

Jenni with Zoryana and Ustym. Jenni was nervous about Ukrainian refugee mother and son meeting her Russian neighbor

I was nervous getting out of the car the other day with my Ukrainian refugees Zoryana and Ustym because a few yards away on my quiet little London street was one of my favorite neighbors, Victor.

He’s the man I can always call for help with a DIY job and is a computer whiz. My anxiety was due to the fact that he and his wife, Masha, are Russian. Our meeting was inevitable. There was only one way to handle this potentially catastrophic encounter. I called ‘Hi’ to Victor. It seemed best to do a proper introduction.

I have no idea what they said to each other. They spoke Russian. There were handshakes – and smiles. In English, he told Zoryana that he was always there to help. I felt such relief – and I hope humanity will triumph in the end.

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