English grammars – Anglomir http://anglomir.net/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 20:08:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://anglomir.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-2-120x120.png English grammars – Anglomir http://anglomir.net/ 32 32 KEVIN MCKENNA’S DIARY: The secret to Dunoon Grammar’s world fame? Students are told that life is just a game https://anglomir.net/kevin-mckennas-diary-the-secret-to-dunoon-grammars-world-fame-students-are-told-that-life-is-just-a-game/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 20:08:04 +0000 https://anglomir.net/kevin-mckennas-diary-the-secret-to-dunoon-grammars-world-fame-students-are-told-that-life-is-just-a-game/ At Dunoon where I met the inspiring staff and students of Dunoon Grammar School who have been voted the best in the world for their community engagement initiatives. The judges were impressed with the school’s commitment to reversing the brain drain that sees young people from Scotland’s islands and its remote and rural communities moving […]]]>

At Dunoon where I met the inspiring staff and students of Dunoon Grammar School who have been voted the best in the world for their community engagement initiatives.

The judges were impressed with the school’s commitment to reversing the brain drain that sees young people from Scotland’s islands and its remote and rural communities moving away from home for more fulfilling lives in busier places.

Those I have met have always expressed regret at not feeling able to make their homes and careers where they were born. And when you visit them, you often want to live and work there.

Paul Gallanagh, Business and IT Manager at Dunoon Grammar, has been the driving force behind many of his students’ engagements with the city. He intends to spend a significant portion of their $50,000 prize money to develop an esports center in the school.

His reasoning is simple: the dynamic tech landscape of esports and gaming is where the big jobs and opportunities are opening up. By developing their expertise in this potentially rewarding industry, students at Dunoon Grammar can gain a crucial advantage when it comes time for them to find employment.

Even better: they won’t have to sit in an office in Glasgow or London to do such work. And if they were to spend most of their lives in a place like Dunoon, they’d probably live a few more years too.

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The numbers that periodically indicate distress in the NHS and our education system often betray the work being done off-camera to improve the picture.

Last week, I interviewed Susan Stewart, Director of the Open University in Scotland, for a long-awaited conversation about the work of this incredible institution. Susan described the OU as second only to the NHS in the list of Britain’s biggest social interventions.

She told me about an OU initiative to help the National Care Service by reskilling and reskilling Scotland’s undervalued and underpaid social workforce. At the same time, an initiative aims to make health and social care a more attractive career path for school leavers.

There is also a strategy to identify NHS employees who are currently working at a relatively junior or unskilled level, but who have shown an aptitude for something more useful. It is a three-way approach involving the 32 Scottish Boards of Health and the Open University, where these workers train part-time to become nurses while the Scottish Government provides the funds to cover their shifts. of work.

Some people, for all sorts of reasons, fail to do themselves justice in adolescence and early adulthood, but society chooses to close the doors to them throughout their lives.

The beauty and simplicity of The Open University is in opening those doors and inviting people to try again.

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I confess to Susan Stewart that I had a rather bad time with my first attempt at education for three years at the University of Glasgow. I left this great place of learning after having rarely glimpsed the interior of one of its amphitheatres.

Instead, I spent a good few dollars of government money to learn first-hand about the economic inequalities of small African states by enrolling in the South West African People’s Organization…or at least their brilliant social evenings.

I have regularly urged the United States to seize El Salvador and Nicaragua; visited Yorkshire to rescue grateful striking miners and insulted Margaret Thatcher during several educational marches. So not everything was a waste of money.

This posed an obvious problem for me when I sat through those crucial first job interviews that could determine the future course of your life: How do you fill the sizable—and uncertified—gap in your college career without lie about it.

As millennials might say, I tried to “own” my failure. I thus explained to my future bosses that the teaching standards of the University of Glasgow, as demanding as they were, had nevertheless not quite met my academic expectations.

And that I would be better off pursuing a career in the more challenging learning environment of their splendid Insurance/Banking/Retail Management/Royal Mail/Civil Service operations.

I had actually undertaken to study English literature at the University of Glasgow. Everything went brilliantly for the first few weeks, reading the English poets of the lake and exploring themes of madness and chaos in the works of Lord Byron.

Then I asked my English teacher when we could expect to start writing our own material. That was, after all, the reason we got the privilege of reading Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats and Coleridge, wasn’t it: to try and produce some poetry and prose ourselves?

This Oxford-educated septuagenarian don had none of that, though. “You are not here to write; you are here to enjoy writing. An old phrase from the west of Scotland about lust and a game of soldiers immediately came to mind.

ENDS

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Cambridge accused of ‘social engineering’ as public school pupils now more likely to get places https://anglomir.net/cambridge-accused-of-social-engineering-as-public-school-pupils-now-more-likely-to-get-places/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 20:05:00 +0000 https://anglomir.net/cambridge-accused-of-social-engineering-as-public-school-pupils-now-more-likely-to-get-places/ Mr Orr-Ewing says he has been told by Oxford insiders that admissions tutors will ‘beat each other’ if they haven’t offered places to students placed in the ‘most favored’ category who come from private schools and have not benefited from a scholarship. He says Keystone Tutors’ job isn’t to “teach tips and tricks.” Instead, “it’s […]]]>

Mr Orr-Ewing says he has been told by Oxford insiders that admissions tutors will ‘beat each other’ if they haven’t offered places to students placed in the ‘most favored’ category who come from private schools and have not benefited from a scholarship.

He says Keystone Tutors’ job isn’t to “teach tips and tricks.” Instead, “it’s much more about exposing inquisitive minds to really difficult things over a long period of time and making them intellectually irresistible.”

“What they really want to avoid is maybe the kind of person I was applying to Harrow from Oxford, who was a ‘decent, bright enough, all in’ candidate, but was wrong. continue and necessarily be an academic or get a first class degree.

Admissions tutors want to ‘see the light’ behind applicants’ eyes

Sarah Alakija, an admissions expert from Oxbridge, says she helped a pupil from Winchester in the last admissions round who was rejected from Oxford, Durham, LSE and Warwick with 3 A* predictions and a ” great personal statement”.

“There was no explanation I could give his parents for this. We made sure he was applying to a college with centuries-old links to Winchester and that didn’t work out either.

She says there’s “nothing wrong” with the Oxbridge app support that schools like Winchester, Eton and St Paul’s already offer their pupils, but “parents are so scared they feel that they will do anything to get the extra edge.” Ms. Alakija is focused on helping students develop a deep level of understanding and passion for the topics they are applying for prior to interviews.

She asked a Cambridge admissions tutor at a recent event what her favorite candidate looked like. “The response was ‘when I interview someone, I want to see the light behind their eyes when they talk about the subject.’ I think that’s what you can’t prepare.


Cambridge professor speaks out on how the college admissions process puts private school students at a disadvantage

Anonymous

The pendulum as it currently stands has certainly swung too far against private schools. Cambridge has opted to voluntarily include public school admissions targets as part of its own targets to be achieved by 2024. admissions in the state this year and 71.6 percent last year. while self-imposed targets were 66.1% and 64.6% respectively.

As so often happens, this success in easily exceeding our goals did not lead to a deep reflection on the process or a detailed study of student results. Instead, it just created a new baseline that we are now being told we need to “improve” on more.

A new “access and participation plan” should be submitted with more ambitious statistics.

The upshot of all of this is that there is indeed a disadvantage for privately trained students. It is of course not true that a truly brilliant student in a public school would ever be blocked from entering. But it is true that, even if it is a question of paying attention only to the characteristics “indicated” in the profile of a person (socio-economic data, low university attendance, postal zone, having been taken care of, free school meals, etc.), having attended an independent school may well play a negative role.

This tends to happen after the strongest candidates (from any school background) have secured a spot: a college admissions tutor, eager to achieve his or her goal. is taxed, will be aware of the proportion of state independents at this stage of the admissions process. , and may find that more offers are needed for public school applicants to reach the (in practice arbitrary) target figure. Thus, at this point, two candidates who scored equally are likely to be disaggregated on the basis of schooling, so that public school is considered “better” for the targets. This may obscure the fact that the independent school applicant is a full-scholarship student from a disadvantaged background, while the public school applicant may be from one of the sixth-form schools. or state grammars the better off. Thus, a coarse metric ends up disadvantageizing those who are potentially equally (or perhaps even more) deserving.

This really comes to a head in the winter and summer pools, when students who failed to gain a place in the college they applied to (winter) or who failed to gain the grades from their offer (summer) are picked up by other colleges. eager to fill their places. It almost always happens that the admissions tutor who oversees these decisions for his colleges finds himself at this point in a position where he feels he can only take few or perhaps even zero students from independent schools.

This essentially excludes deserving applicants (which is what the winter pool is supposed to consider) at this crucial stage of the process, not for academic reasons but due to school decisions made, presumably, by their parents. If we indeed decide that privileged candidates with excellent education are also saddled with the burden of that privilege, then the process begins to look dirty, unfair and, on an intellectual level, indefensible. Meanwhile, very wealthy foreign applicants are welcome, as they pay significantly higher fees and do not infringe on local student statistics.

That said, the vast majority of academics strive to take the best applicants – by which we mean those who seem to have the greatest potential to thrive in the course, which is not exactly the same as those who are successful best in their A-levels. and entrance exams. We seek to judge each applicant on their own academic merits, and many of us have not been barred from taking any given applicant because of their school. But if parents have paid to bring a child through, say, Eton, and admissions to that school have halved in the past seven years, the writing may be on the wall for those in independent schools who are not not considered first class.

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Schools minister accused of breaking MPs code over £7,200 donation | Communal room https://anglomir.net/schools-minister-accused-of-breaking-mps-code-over-7200-donation-communal-room/ Mon, 10 Oct 2022 17:06:00 +0000 https://anglomir.net/schools-minister-accused-of-breaking-mps-code-over-7200-donation-communal-room/ Schools Minister Jonathan Gullis has been charged with a potential breach of the MPs’ Code for failing to declare donations for high school curriculum campaigns when advocating for selective education in the Commons. In a letter to Kathryn Stone, the Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards, Labor said Gullis should have declared a donation of £7,200 to […]]]>

Schools Minister Jonathan Gullis has been charged with a potential breach of the MPs’ Code for failing to declare donations for high school curriculum campaigns when advocating for selective education in the Commons.

In a letter to Kathryn Stone, the Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards, Labor said Gullis should have declared a donation of £7,200 to a campaign for high schools when he was advocating as a backbench MP for their expansion.

The Members’ register of interests shows that Gullis, the MP for Stoke-on-Trent North, who was appointed Schools Minister in September by Liz Truss, was given the money to pay for public relations advice for a campaign for new high schools.

The letter, from shadow schools minister Stephen Morgan, notes that after receiving the money, Gullis twice spoke in the Commons as a backbench MP. call for a new generation of high schools, not to mention the financial interest.

While there’s no suggestion money shaped the views of Gullis — a former teacher, he’s a longtime high school advocate — the Members’ Code of Conduct says they must “be open and frank in drawing attention to any relevant interest in any proceedings of the House or its committees”.

It is understood that Gullis has already written to Stone to apologize for the oversight and to formally acknowledge the financial interest.

The £7,200, to pay for public relations advice for a Gullis campaign was setting up itself, was donated by Kent-based property developer Quinn Estates, whose chief executive, Mark Quinn, is a former Tory MP donor.

As schools minister, Gullis is in a position to play a leading role in deciding whether or not Truss’ government will lift the ban on new high schools in England, imposed in 1998 under Tony Blair.

While selective public education still exists in several English counties, with 163 grammar schools remaining, Prohibition has prevented the creation of entirely new grammars for the past 24 years, the only exception being the expansion of existing schools.

During the Tory leadership campaign, Truss said she would look into whether this should be overturned and has since tasked new education secretary Kit Malthouse with looking into how this might happen.

While Gullis and other grammar advocates say they help students from disadvantaged backgrounds and would help improve schools across England, education experts and research studies have shown they can in fact harm social mobility, in part because their students tend to come disproportionately from more privileged families.

Although the new grammars are a popular idea among Tory members and some MPs, there is little evidence of their appeal to voters more broadly, especially as around 80% of all children are said to be missing out.

Polls show that less than a third of Britons support a new generation of grammars, with even supporters of the system often accepting that it tends to cause less gifted students to fail.

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In Aichi, This Japanese Word “Dirty” Means Something Different https://anglomir.net/in-aichi-this-japanese-word-dirty-means-something-different/ Sat, 01 Oct 2022 13:29:06 +0000 https://anglomir.net/in-aichi-this-japanese-word-dirty-means-something-different/ A newspaper article using Pokemon to teach Japanese dialects has gained traction on Twitter due to an unexpected double meaning. Twitter users were surprised to learn that “chinchin”, a common word in the dialect of Aichi prefecture, means something different elsewhere. What might be part of someone’s everyday vocabulary in Aichi is actually a “dirty” […]]]>

A newspaper article using Pokemon to teach Japanese dialects has gained traction on Twitter due to an unexpected double meaning. Twitter users were surprised to learn that “chinchin”, a common word in the dialect of Aichi prefecture, means something different elsewhere.

What might be part of someone’s everyday vocabulary in Aichi is actually a “dirty” word elsewhere. The dialects of Japan are many and varied, and a word can mean many different things across the country.

The dialects of Japan

Japanese is not a monolithic language. Different regions and prefectures have their own dialects, with unique vocabularies, grammars and ways of speaking. Linguists currently recognize more than a dozen distinct dialects, usually separated into Eastern and Western Japanese dialects.

Some dialects vary only slightly from “standard” Japanese, while others differ significantly. The dialects of Okinawa, Kagoshima, Ryukyu Islands, Hachijo-jima, and Aogashima are sometimes considered separate branches of the Japanese language.[1]

At the highest level, linguists divide dialects into Kanto-ben, or Eastern Japanese, and Kansai-ben, or Western Japanese. Kansai-ben is the best known Japanese dialect and has many grammatical variations such as the ending of negative words in “not” Where “naked” instead of “nah.” Osaka-ben ends negative words in “chicken” and often concludes sentences with the particle “of” Where “Washington.Kansai-ben speaking characters appear frequently in Japanese films and television.[2]

Kyoto-ben, which replaces the end-of-sentence sentence “desu” with “dosu”, is often perceived as a refined and elegant sound. Hokkaido-ben features many loanwords from the language of the indigenous Ainu people. These include menkoi meaning “cute” and “Oban” meaning “good evening”. (Another example is the northern bay haskap, Ainu hashikapu.)

You say “very hot”, I say…

Warm weather

The dialect of Aichi Prefecture is generally called “Nagoya-ben”, after Nagoya, the largest city in Aichi. It includes elements of Eastern and Western Japanese due to Nagoya’s central position between Tokyo and Kyoto/Osaka.

The word Aichi- or Nagoya-ben that has recently caught the eye on Twitter is “cheers. “Chinchin” in Aichi means “very hot”. It refers to objects or temperatures that are too hot to be described using the standard “atsu.

However, in the rest of Japan, “chinchin” is a slang term referring to the penis. It’s a “cute” nickname similar to English “wee-wee” or “pee-pee”. The association of ‘chinchin’ with the penis is so strong that the Western comic character Tintin was renamed ‘Tantan’ in Japanese because he looked too much like ‘Chinchin’. Many people outside of Aichi Prefecture are unaware of the “very hot” meaning of the word and know it exclusively as slang for genitals.

Newspaper article shared on Twitter uses the Pokemon Dodekabashi, known as Toucannon in English, as an example of how “chinchin” is used in the Aichi dialect. The original phrase means “Toucannon’s beak gets very hot when attacking an enemy.” However, the alternative meaning of the word means that the phrase can also be read as “Toucannon’s beak becomes a penis when attacking an enemy”. This produces an amusing mental image of the beak of the Normal/Flying type Pokémon which is unfortunately replaced by a set of genitals.

Other fun aspects of the Aichi language

Using “chinchin” to mean “very hot” isn’t the only unique word or phrase found in Nagoya or the rest of Aichi Prefecture. A person in Aichi who finds themselves surprised by something may choose to end a sentence with “gaya” to indicate his feelings. If you use Aichi-ben to repeat second-hand gossip you heard from another person or read in the newspaper, you can use “gena”, meaning “so they say”. A bicycle, rather than being called a “jitensha’, could instead be a “ketta”, while something that is spoiled or rotten could be described as “way.[3]

If you’re traveling to Japan, chances are every region you visit has its own local dialect. Learning local words and phrases is a great way to expand your knowledge of the Japanese language. And, if you’re traveling to Aichi in the summer, don’t forget to pack clothes suitable for the “chinchin” weather!

What to read next

Sources

[1] Okumura, Nao. “Japanese Dialect Ideology from Meiji to the Present.” Portland State University. July 26, 2016. Link.

[2] Long live Japan. “【関西弁】大阪・京都などでよく使う関西独特の言葉・例文18選.” January 25, 2021. Link.

[3] Nagoya International Center. Nagoya-ben. December 1, 2015. Link.

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‘They don’t work’: Experts slam Liz Truss’ high school plan | Grammar schools https://anglomir.net/they-dont-work-experts-slam-liz-truss-high-school-plan-grammar-schools/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://anglomir.net/they-dont-work-experts-slam-liz-truss-high-school-plan-grammar-schools/ Academics, education unions and politicians of all colors have attacked the government’s plans for more grammar schools, warning that selection does not improve social mobility and will not solve the challenges facing schools in the next decade. It follows the confirmation of the new Education Secretary, Malting kitthat the Prime Minister has instructed him to […]]]>

Academics, education unions and politicians of all colors have attacked the government’s plans for more grammar schools, warning that selection does not improve social mobility and will not solve the challenges facing schools in the next decade.

It follows the confirmation of the new Education Secretary, Malting kitthat the Prime Minister has instructed him to consider areas of England which would like to open new grammar schools, as well as those which wish to extend existing grammars.

In an interview with the Yorkshire Post During a visit to the university this week, Malthouse said: ‘The Premier made it clear during the leadership race that she wanted to see work on high schools, basically because parents in some parts of the countries wish to have them.

“We are talking about parental choice, everyone should be able to make a choice for their children. So we are looking at this policy seriously and looking at areas that want to have it or even high schools that want to expand.

Liz Trusswho sent his daughters to high school, however, will face broad opposition, including from modernizers within his own party who have seen a earlier attempt to revive high schools more broadly in 2016 when Theresa May was prime minister.

There are only 163 secondary schools left in England and new ones have been banned since 1998. Any lifting of this ban, introduced by the Labor government, would require primary legislation. Although the government has a large majority in the Commons, it would face strong opposition in the House of Lords.

Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the 1922 committee of Conservative backbenchers and a longtime grammar school supporter, is signaled that he planned to table an amendment to the government’s recent Schools Bill in an attempt to lift the ban.

David Johnston, Conservative MP for Wantage and former chairman of the Social Mobility Foundation, warned that the return of high schools would be deeply divisive for the country and within the Conservative Party.

Write in the viewer, he said, “I know high schools are popular with members and my views won’t be. But bringing them back would be a serious misstep for education policy. They distract us from what we should be doing, they serve the rich not the poor – and they don’t work.

Steve Mastin, a former head of history at a public high school and vice president of the Conservative Education Society, said he would speak out against high schools at the Conservative Party conference. “High schools reduce parental choice. It is the school that selects, not the parents. And 80% of students in the country will be refused to go to a high school.

Shadow Education Secretary Bridget Phillipson said the high schools were “a distraction tactic” from a government that had run out of ideas. “Grammars are a tiny minority of schools, they don’t improve learning outcomes and parents don’t want them – they want the Education Secretary to raise standards in our comprehensive schools.”

Liberal Democrat education spokeswoman Munira Wilson said it was a “desperate attempt” by the Conservatives to hide their own failures. “Rather than supporting children who are working hard to catch up on their lost learning, the Conservatives would prefer to impose top-down rules on the types of schools that can be built in communities.

Lee Elliot Major, professor of social mobility at the University of Exeter, warned that introducing new grammar schools without strong measures to ensure access for children from all backgrounds would create “an exclusive cadre of schools in the middle class, certainly not engines of social mobility in any way”. at all”.

Jon Andrews, head of analysis at the Education Policy Institute, said it was an “aging debate” detracting from the real issues facing schools. “Whether it’s reducing inequality in education, tackling teacher shortages, or even just helping schools deal with dramatically increased operating costs, high schools are not the solution.”

Dr Nuala Burgess, chair of campaign group Comprehensive Future, said: ‘It is extremely concerning that an untested new government could choose to sweep away all reason and the weight of evidence that shows the very limited value of high schools for a tiny minority of children.

“Ask any parent what they want for their child’s education and it’s definitely not ‘more high schools’. Parents want well-funded, well-funded schools.

Geoff Barton, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, said the expansion of high schools was “purely ideological”. He said the significant issues facing the education sector remain funding and shortage of teachers. “Resolving these issues would make the biggest difference in improving outcomes for all students, which is certainly any government’s priority.”

Case studies

Sally Weale, education correspondent

As the government draws up plans for more secondary schools in England, a new website has launched to give a voice to parents, pupils and teachers who have first-hand experience of the 11-plus test and its impact.

About 100,000 children currently turn 11 and over each year to secure a place in one of the 163 high schools still in operation. Here are some of the comments from 11+ Anonymous site, set up by campaign group Comprehensive Future.

On the stress of the test, a father from Kent, where the grammar system still works, said: “A few nights before the test I looked at the search history on my daughter’s tablet. The latest research said “How to Cope When You’re Panicking About Something”. A 10 year old child!

On tuition fees, a mum from Sevenoaks said: ‘We’ve spent £2,000 on tutoring fees over the last year. Everyone I know does that. I am envious of friends who live in areas where there are only good understandings. No stress for the 10 year old, no feeling of failure, just the free quality education he deserves.

A tutor aged over 11 in Trafford, Greater Manchester, where there are grammars, said: ‘I have seen many very bright children fail because of exam nervousness and less able children are lucky on the day and successful. For many children of roughly similar ability, the exam becomes little more than a lottery of luck rather than a test of ability.

A mother from Trafford said she knew of several children who had fallen ill under the weight of waiting. “Children who fail often suffer significant, sometimes lifelong, damage to their self-esteem. No child should go through this to get a good education and no child should be called a failure at 10 or 11 years old.

On the long-term impact of 11+, a 63-year-old grandmother said: “The 11+ test had such a negative impact on me and created self-esteem issues that persist to this day. “I’m not dumb. But I’ve had low self-esteem issues when it comes to my intellect and worth since I ‘failed’ that horrible test in 1969.”

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Parents refuse to send their children to the school “dump” eight kilometers away | United Kingdom | New https://anglomir.net/parents-refuse-to-send-their-children-to-the-school-dump-eight-kilometers-away-united-kingdom-new/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 11:40:00 +0000 https://anglomir.net/parents-refuse-to-send-their-children-to-the-school-dump-eight-kilometers-away-united-kingdom-new/ Parents refuse to send their children to a ‘dump’ school five miles away (Picture: MEN) A gang of angry parents are refusing to send their children to secondary school after they were offered places in schools miles from their homes. The parents refuse to accept places at the school and appeal to the town hall […]]]>

Parents refuse to send their children to a ‘dump’ school five miles away (Picture: MEN)

A gang of angry parents are refusing to send their children to secondary school after they were offered places in schools miles from their homes.

The parents refuse to accept places at the school and appeal to the town hall to find them places closer to home.

All the families live in the Wythenshawe area near M22/M23 in Greater Manchester, and have applied to various schools for their Year 7 children, including Sale High, Altrincham College and Blessed Thomas Holford Catholic College.

In previous years, they say families have never had a problem finding places at these schools near them.

Now dozens of them have been offered places at Manchester Academy High in Moss Side – up to five miles away, reports Manchester Evening News.

Families say not only is it unreasonable to expect their children to travel so far, but they have ‘serious safeguarding concerns’ about the school, where a 14-year-old student has was stabbed in the neck during an examination last December.

Part of the problem is the government-mandated closure of Newall Green High School, Wythenshawe, which has left fewer places in area schools.

Angela Davies, from Baguley, is among those annoyed by what happened and wishes her daughter Maisie could go to school closer to home.

She said: “We have attended all of the Trafford Schools Open Nights and have chosen our top three – Altrincham College, Sale High and Wellington School.

“I thought if we didn’t get them we’d probably get a local school closer to home, but then we were offered one five miles away in Moss Side.”

Angela has joined some online homeschooling groups and is struggling to juggle her own work to find support for Maisie and consider paying a tutor for maths and English.

Angela Davis

Angela Davies didn’t think it would be a problem for her daughter to find a school nearby (Picture: MEN)

She is one of around 60 parents who have joined a Facebook group called Campaign for a Greater Manchester Secondary Schools Allowance Review, set up by dad Wayne Cribbin, whose daughter Lilly attended the same school as Maisie.

Wayne also applied for Blessed Thomas, Sale High and Didsbury High, but Lilly was offered Manchester Academy.

Having lost their appeal, she, like Maisie, is now at home, instead of starting Year 7.

“We failed in our applications and went through the appeal process and it became very clear that if your child is from a stable home, they will go to the back of the queue,” Wayne said.

“We were assigned a school which would involve our daughter leaving an hour and a half early to ensure she gets to school on time, yet we have two high schools within a 10 minute walk of home. we.

“There appears to be a big gap in school allocations and the closure of Newall Green High School last year has not been taken into consideration and children in M22/M23 are being allocated a school which would not not in the remote admissions criteria should it be otherwise, but it seems like a fitting dumping ground for a problem of their making.

“The assigned school has real protection issues and that is one of the many reasons why myself and other parents refuse to send our children.”

A Manchester Academy spokesman said the school had “effective” protection.

They said: “The parents’ disagreement is with the council, not the academy, and we understand their frustration at not being offered places at local schools in their area.

“Backing up is effective, however, at Manchester Academy.

“We are a happy and thriving school and we are very open to welcoming families to see for themselves why we are proud of our academy and our community.

“Equally, we always speak directly to parents who express concerns, to reassure them that even though we were not the school they chose, their child will be safe and happy here and will be made very welcome. “

wayne cribbin

Wayne Cribbin called the school a ‘garbage dump’ (Picture: MEN)

Manchester City Council acknowledges the loss of Newall Green High has increased demand for school places and says this is why it has opposed the government-mandated closure in 2020.

The decision was made due to dwindling pupil numbers and a poor Ofsted record but, even then, the decision was lambasted by local councillors, parents and pupils.

The new free school coming to the area – Dixons Newall Green Academy – will now open a year earlier in September 2023, to meet demand.

For parents like Angela and Wayne, whose children are now “down the waiting list” for other schools, they feel their children have been very disappointed.

“They had all the data about the high birth rates and the projected increase in required places in secondary schools,” Angela said.

“They should have had plans in place to increase the number of places in our areas to meet those projections.

“I understand that it’s not always possible to get your preferred choices, but their lack of planning has led to many parents, including myself, being presented with a very unreasonable alternative offer.”

To help with this year’s situation, the council has created an additional 100 places at the three local grammar schools – all of which have been filled – but says that for the places offered at Manchester Academy it cannot do anything more.

Parents

Angry parents created a Facebook group to campaign (Picture: MEN)

Councilor Garry Bridges, Executive Member for Early Years, Children and Young People of Manchester City Council, said: ‘We understand the disappointment felt by families and children who have been offered a place at school who is not the one they have chosen or is closest to their home.

“Unfortunately Manchester schools are in high demand and there is a particular shortage of Year 7 high school places in Wythenshawe.

“This is due to the Government’s decision to close Newall Green High School – a decision which we fought very strongly at the time as we knew it would lead to a shortage of places for local families. We are now seeing the consequences of this bad decision.

“We have continued to lobby the DFE about the shortage of places in the area since the school closed, and as a result they have agreed that their newly approved free school for the area, Dixons Newall Green Academy , will open a year earlier, next September 2023.

“We welcome this as it will significantly improve the situation in the region, but unfortunately not in time for these students.”

He added: “When parents living in Manchester apply for a school place in Trafford or any other local authority area, we have no control over that.

“If a parent is unsuccessful in securing a place at a school outside the area and has not named a Manchester school on their application form – which we always advise parents to do – then this may mean, as in the case of many of these families, that they lose a place in their local school because places will have already been allocated to other families.

“Unfortunately, this means that while we understand parents’ frustrations, there is not much more we can do.

“We fully accept that Manchester Academy is further away than some families would like, but we have also offered free passes to help them get there.

“We do not, however, accept any suggestion that this is an unsafe school.

“It has a strong culture of care and community, coupled with strong leadership and an ambitious educational offering that is highly valued by students and their families.

“He also has a good track record of supporting students in the local community and across the city, and together with the council will do everything possible to make the transition of students to their new high school as easy as possible and to support families. in this domain.

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What Harold Wilson can teach Keir Starmer https://anglomir.net/what-harold-wilson-can-teach-keir-starmer/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 06:04:49 +0000 https://anglomir.net/what-harold-wilson-can-teach-keir-starmer/ Commented here Harold Wilson: the winner by Nick Thomas-Symonds (recommended retail price: £25) Buy at Bookshop.org Prospect receives a commission when you purchase a book using this page. Thanks for supporting us. The beatification of Harold Wilson, especially within the Labor Party, is a wonder to behold. Tories have always had a grudging admiration for […]]]>

Commented here

Harold Wilson: the winner

by Nick Thomas-Symonds (recommended retail price: £25)

Buy at Bookshop.org

Prospect receives a commission when you purchase a book using this page. Thanks for supporting us.

The beatification of Harold Wilson, especially within the Labor Party, is a wonder to behold. Tories have always had a grudging admiration for the master tactician who won four of five elections in the turbulent decade between 1964 and 1974. But his name was mud among Bennites and Blairites in the years from his resignation in 1976 until the end of Blair. time. To the Labor left, he sold out; on the right, it hasn’t sold or “upgraded” enough. His previous biographers were ambivalent at best. His sordid resignation honors list – wealthy tycoon James Goldsmith et al – casts a long shadow.

Now everything is changed. This revisionist proudly…

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The ugly truth about Liz Truss https://anglomir.net/the-ugly-truth-about-liz-truss/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://anglomir.net/the-ugly-truth-about-liz-truss/ Was it just me or was Liz Truss actually smiling when declaring outside Downing Street, the one littered with cliches about spikes in the ground and grimacing turns of phrase like “aspirational nation”? Two more years of this prime minister talking about being “determined to deliver” (deliver what, Liz?) It’s gonna be really tough. Listen […]]]>

Was it just me or was Liz Truss actually smiling when declaring outside Downing Street, the one littered with cliches about spikes in the ground and grimacing turns of phrase like “aspirational nation”? Two more years of this prime minister talking about being “determined to deliver” (deliver what, Liz?) It’s gonna be really tough.

Listen to her. Look at her. Is this really the best we can get from a country of 67 million people? Liz Truss? Can even the most blind conservative find any real eloquence or charm in the manners; or Theresa May-style sincerity, Tony Blair-style charisma, or Boris Johnson-style humor, or Gordon Brown-style conviction, rather than outspokenness, in her flat, unmodulated accent, intended to convey the conviction ? What is it about the woman who made them fall in love with her, these Tory members and MPs, other than the one redeeming circumstance that she is not Penny Mordaunt? An effective communicator like Nicola Sturgeon? No. Not even that.

You can see what she has going for her, of course, which is iron ambition. One look at her tells you, even before you see her photo streak from the past two years, that this is a woman who would pass by you for a shortcut. And it worked. But virtually all MPs are ambitious; half of them aspire to be Prime Minister; Surely it takes more to get to where she is now?

What she has, of course, is a series of appointments to the highest offices in the country – Environment, Foreign Office, Lord Chancellor – all of which she has held without distinction. In fact, when it comes to its environmental stint, it appears its lax approach to inspection meant it allowed some farmers to pollute English rivers unchecked. In the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, her ignorance of Russia (mocked by Sergei Lavrov) and her insistence that Ukraine take back Crimea make her, in my opinion, downright dangerous. Oh and she wholeheartedly supports Israel. Of course she is.

In other words, we owe Boris for Liz Truss, probably on the basis that he couldn’t be bothered to appoint to these big offices someone who was actually competent to run them well. Was it the big poppy thing, whereby he didn’t want someone close who might actually look like a competitor?

As for his policies, where to start? So, so thoughtless, so poorly held that you can huff and puff, and you can knock them down. Elsewhere on these pages there are analyzes of its energy policy, to this we can add its wacky ideas on education – bringing back grammars (good, but not sufficient in themselves) and obtaining the compulsory Oxbridge interviews for starred A pupils (do you know how many there are, Liz?). And there was this downright terrifying interview where she was asked how willing she was to use nuclear deterrence (answer: very).

It’s embarassing. It is extremely painful. And that’s just the beginning. I leave it to the Conservatives to take advantage of what they have imposed on the nation. Me, I’m going to join the CND.

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The problem with Liz Truss https://anglomir.net/the-problem-with-liz-truss/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://anglomir.net/the-problem-with-liz-truss/ Was it just me or was Liz Truss actually smiling during her statement outside Downing Street, the one littered with cliches about spikes in the ground and grimacing turns of phrase like ‘aspirational nation’? Two more years of this prime minister talking about being “determined to deliver” (deliver what, Liz?) It’s gonna be really tough. […]]]>

Was it just me or was Liz Truss actually smiling during her statement outside Downing Street, the one littered with cliches about spikes in the ground and grimacing turns of phrase like ‘aspirational nation’? Two more years of this prime minister talking about being “determined to deliver” (deliver what, Liz?) It’s gonna be really tough.

Listen to her. Look at her. Is this really the best we can get from a country of 67 million people? Liz Truss? Can even the most blind conservative find any real eloquence or charm in the manners; or Theresa May-style sincerity, Tony Blair-style charisma, or Boris Johnson-style humor, or Gordon Brown-style conviction, rather than outspokenness, in her flat, unmodulated accent, intended to convey the conviction ? What is it about the woman who made them fall in love with her, these Tory members and MPs, other than the one redeeming circumstance that she is not Penny Mordaunt? An effective communicator like Nicola Sturgeon? No. Not even that.

You can see what she has going for her, of course, which is iron ambition. One look at her tells you, even before you see her photo streak from the past two years, that this is a woman who would pass by you for a shortcut. And it worked. But virtually all MPs are ambitious; half of them aspire to be Prime Minister; Surely it takes more to get to where she is now?

What she has, of course, is a series of appointments to the highest offices in the country – Environment, Foreign Office, Lord Chancellor – all of which she has held without distinction. In fact, when it comes to its environmental stint, it appears its lax approach to inspection meant it allowed some farmers to pollute English rivers unchecked. In the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, her ignorance of Russia (mocked by Sergei Lavrov) and her insistence that Ukraine take back Crimea make her, in my opinion, downright dangerous. Oh and she wholeheartedly supports Israel. Of course she is.

In other words, we owe Boris for Liz Truss, probably on the basis that he couldn’t be bothered to appoint to these big offices someone who was actually competent to run them well. Was it the big poppy thing, whereby he didn’t want someone close who might actually look like a competitor?

As for his policies, where to start? So, so thoughtless, so poorly held that you can huff and puff, and you can knock them down. Elsewhere in these pages there are damning analyzes of his energy policy, to which you can add his silly ideas about education – bringing back grammars (good, but not enough on their own) and getting mandatory Oxbridge interviews for A-star students (any idea just how many there are, Liz?). And there was this downright terrifying interview where she was asked how willing she was to use nuclear deterrence (answer: very).

It’s embarassing. It is extremely painful. And that’s just the beginning. I leave it to the Conservatives to take advantage of what they have imposed on the nation. Me, I’m going to join the CND.

Britain After Boris: Coffee House Shots Live, starring Andrew Neil, Fraser Nelson, Katy Balls, James Forsyth and Kate Andrews will take place on September 13. To book tickets Click here
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This & That with Maluphosa: The Endangered Species https://anglomir.net/this-that-with-maluphosa-the-endangered-species/ Mon, 22 Aug 2022 10:14:23 +0000 https://anglomir.net/this-that-with-maluphosa-the-endangered-species/ I feel that the Ndebele language is in danger – and we, the guardians of the language of law as elderly people – are not helping the situation. How would you feel if you were the last Ndebele speaker in the whole world? Scary, isn’t it? Whatever country you are currently in, what are you […]]]>

I feel that the Ndebele language is in danger – and we, the guardians of the language of law as elderly people – are not helping the situation. How would you feel if you were the last Ndebele speaker in the whole world? Scary, isn’t it?

Whatever country you are currently in, what are you doing to preserve IsiNdebele? Your children speak the Queen’s English but they don’t know simple words like ‘isitshwala’ or ‘kwanele’. It’s as if we were embarrassed ngokuba ngama Ndebele. There is a country in South Africa – yes a country – called Orania. It is a country only for Afrikaners – those who want to preserve their language and culture, and all things Afrikaner. They have their own flag, constitution, schools, money and are a complete sovereign state. There is no way their ways are lost, as anyone who is not Afrikaner is banned from this territory. I guess this is also the dream of the Mthwakazi Republic Party?

Ancient Greek and Latin are good examples of languages ​​that gradually died out. These languages ​​are considered dead because they are no longer spoken in the form in which they are found in ancient writings. But they were not suddenly replaced by other languages; instead, Ancient Greek slowly evolved into Modern Greek, and Latin slowly evolved into Italian, Spanish, French, Romanian, and other modern languages. Similarly, the Middle English of Chaucer’s time is no longer spoken, but has evolved into Modern English.

Soon we will be speaking a form of language without identity – but strongly leaning towards the language of our rulers.

There are several reasons why languages ​​die. The reasons are often of a political, economic or cultural nature. Speakers of a minority language may, for example, decide that it is better for the future of their children to teach them a language linked to economic success. In many countries, English has become an indispensable entity in our daily paraphernalia. If you want a job in Zimbabwe, you must have passed English at O ​​level. The language, newspapers and currency only become powerful when their circulation is high. So if a language does not become a language of economics; unless a language offers an economic incentive or employment opportunity to its people, it is bound to be in danger. Shona has been linked to all of our activities of daily living – you have to be Shona to get a job, or a place in college, or to get food aid from the government. Therefore, many of our fellow citizens have used Shona to camouflage their true identity, just to gain economic and/or political advantage. Some products have been given Shona names – such as chibataura, chimombe, mushonga, chikwapuro – all used in public media advertisements.

Political prejudices also prove to be detrimental to the promotion of a language as they create discrimination between social groups and play a divisive role for socio-political reasons. Our communities are now infiltrated by shonas – whether in cities or in rural areas, so that they teach us their language and their abominable ways. And, people can only elect you to parliament or be president if you are Shona.

Outright genocide is another cause of language extinction. For example, when European invaders wiped out the Tasmanians in the early 19th century, an unknown number of languages ​​also died. Much more often, however, languages ​​die out when a community finds itself under pressure to integrate into a larger or more powerful group. Sometimes people learn the language of foreigners in addition to their own; this happened in Greenland, a territory of Denmark, where Kalaallisut is learned alongside Danish. But often the community is pressured to give up their language and even their ethnic and cultural identity. This has been the case for ethnic Kurds in Turkey, who are prohibited by law from printing or officially teaching their language.

The Zimbabwean government also used this method – attempting to exterminate all Ndebele-speaking inhabitants – and punishing survivors by denying them genocide victim death certificates and access to basic government services. When was the last time you saw any form of development in your community? When was the last time you attended a job interview where you were interviewed by your people? Or your favorite language?

The feeling of giving a symbol of prestige to a particular language and presenting it as a symbol of civilization, of progress and the feeling of giving low prestige to an endangered language contribute to the loss of a language. Political prejudices also prove to be detrimental to the promotion of a language as they create discrimination between social groups and play a divisive role for socio-political reasons.

Shona has been given this status as a national, if not international, symbol. All national events are addressed in Shona; while Ndebele was relegated to the language of thugs, barbarians and ignoramuses. Our schools, our roads, our government offices, our hospitals are occupied by Shona-speaking foreigners who want to impose their ways on all of us.

When there is a lack of institutional support, such as the representation of a language in public domains, for example academia, administration, sports, entertainment and the media, the situation of language switching arises and speakers of an endangered language drift to the dominant language causing loss. of the language. We have had many instances where our parliamentarians have been booed when they speak Ndebele in parliament, forcing them to drift into the language of their colonizers and oppressors, the Shona.

When a community loses its language, it often loses much of its cultural identity at the same time. Although language loss can be voluntary or involuntary, it always involves some kind of pressure and is often felt as a loss of social identity or as a symbol of defeat. This does not mean that a group’s social identity is always lost when its language is lost; for example, the Chumash in California and the Manx on the Isle of Man lost their native language, but not their identity as Chumash or Manx. But language is a powerful symbol of group identity.

Much of the cultural, spiritual and intellectual life of a people is lived through language. These range from prayers, myths, ceremonies, poetry, oratory and technical vocabulary to daily greetings, farewells, conversation styles, humor, ways of speaking to children and terms for habits, behaviors and emotions. When a language is lost, it all has to be remade in the new language – with different words, sounds and grammar – if it is to be retained. Often traditions are abruptly lost in the process and replaced by the cultural habits of the more powerful group. For these and other reasons, it is often very important to the community itself that its language survive.

A community that wants to preserve or revive its language has several options. Perhaps the most dramatic story is that of modern Hebrew, which was revived as a native language after centuries of learning and studying only in its ancient written form. Irish has enjoyed considerable institutional and political support as the national language of Ireland, despite major advances in English. In New Zealand, Māori communities have established elder-run nursery schools run entirely in Māori, called kohanga reo, “language nests”. There, as well as in Alaska, Hawaii and elsewhere, this model is extended to elementary school and, in some cases, to high school. And in California, young adults have become language apprentices to older adult speakers in communities where only a few older speakers still live. A growing number of conferences, workshops and publications now offer support to individuals, schools and communities trying to preserve languages.

These can also work for us – running all of our institutions with our own staff. It makes no sense for an Ndebele speaker who knows nothing of the Shona language and culture to teach the early years of Mashonaland. But how many Shona teachers are there in our primary schools, teaching the lower grades? We should restore the pride and value of IsiNdebele. This involves the active support and participation of individuals from across the community, as well as the development of teachers and programs designed to meet current and future needs.

Because so many languages ​​are threatened with extinction, including Isindebele, linguists try to learn as much as possible about them, so that even if the language disappears, all knowledge of the language will not disappear along with it. Researchers make videotapes, audiotapes, and written recordings of language use in formal and informal contexts, as well as translations.

In addition, they analyze the vocabulary and rules of the language and write dictionaries and grammars. Linguists also work with communities around the world who wish to preserve their languages, offering both technical and practical assistance for language teaching, maintenance and revival. This help is based in part on the dictionaries and grammars that they write. But linguists can also help in other ways, using their experience in teaching and studying a wide variety of languages. They can use what they’ve learned about other endangered languages ​​to help a community preserve their own language, and they can take advantage of the latest technology to record and study languages.

We should restore the pride and value of IsiNdebele. This involves the active support and participation of individuals from across the community, as well as the development of teachers and programs designed to meet current and future needs.

Ngiyabonga mina!

Mal’phosa

Live from Jobourg

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