English dialects – Anglomir http://anglomir.net/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 17:54:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://anglomir.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-2-120x120.png English dialects – Anglomir http://anglomir.net/ 32 32 Interview: Sudha G Tilak, Translator, Hungry Humans by Karichan Kunju – “I think in English, I feel in Tamil and I flirt in Bengali” https://anglomir.net/interview-sudha-g-tilak-translator-hungry-humans-by-karichan-kunju-i-think-in-english-i-feel-in-tamil-and-i-flirt-in-bengali/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 17:54:36 +0000 https://anglomir.net/interview-sudha-g-tilak-translator-hungry-humans-by-karichan-kunju-i-think-in-english-i-feel-in-tamil-and-i-flirt-in-bengali/ This is your first translation of a Tamil work into English. How was the process? It was joyful because for over two decades my contact with Tamil after leaving Chennai was minimal. I speak some Tamil – to friends or family – and watch Tamil movies sporadically and rarely read works in Tamil today. Writing […]]]>

This is your first translation of a Tamil work into English. How was the process?

It was joyful because for over two decades my contact with Tamil after leaving Chennai was minimal. I speak some Tamil – to friends or family – and watch Tamil movies sporadically and rarely read works in Tamil today. Writing the book was a good start even though the process was quite demanding. I began by simultaneously reading and translating the first three chapters of Pasitha Manidam. Then, when I felt a momentum building in my reading and writing, I started reading the novel over and over and working on it.

288pp, ₹499; viking penguin

Will you ever attempt to reverse the process, i.e. translate an English book into Tamil?

I did it. Almost a decade ago someone in Chennai published a non-fiction book in Tamil – a collection of essays – and I had a wonderful time translating it into English. It was tragic that the work never saw the light of day because its publication was aborted, but I still believe that the experience was special.

What is the hardest thing about Tamil to English translation?

Dialects and uses. Tamil is one of the ancient languages ​​of the world, but it is surprisingly good at keeping up to date and adding new words to its vocabulary. We don’t say Facebook, World Wide Web or Nasdaq in Tamil. We have translated them into Tamil even though they are proper names. Likewise, when it comes to modern classics or literary works like hungry humans, dialects and anachronisms that were authentic at the start of the 20th century can pose a challenge. As in any Indian novel dealing with family and relationships, the names of the family members in relation to the characters differ. Not everyone is an aunt or uncle, maternal cousins ​​and paternal relations have different names that require careful translation.

Did you come across anything that was untranslatable?

Certain dialectical cadences and descriptive passages and writing about sexuality and sex were difficult. They read with a different emotional weight in Tamil. English-educated Indians are often conditioned to be outraged by vernacular descriptions of sex when they are acceptable in English. Steamy expressions of sexual feelings move in tongues. It’s a bit like when some Indians swear easily in English but balk when they hear swear words in Indian languages. It is difficult to reach the high tone, the melodramatic notes and the fervor of the translation. My other issue was my reading awakening to the characters, the unapologetic male gaze, caste conceit and the treatment of women, trans men and gays and how I would translate them true to the prevailing attitudes at the time where the story is settling.

The book has extreme themes like illness, desire and spirituality which immerse the reader in the story of Ganesan. What was your first experience as a novel reader and translator?

Honestly, I felt pretty shaken up. It took me many readings to understand that the story should be read raw because it is without literary artifice. It’s a hard look at what human beings are. hungry humans rejects familiar narrative. This is not a linear narrative; the characters are numerous; no one is good or bad. Everyone is damaged in one way or another. If I am biased and asked to choose, I would choose Bhuma and Sama. Bhuma is a lucid, warm and sexually and socially generous woman. Sama’s madness, funeral jobs, and savage sadness hurt my heart.

You speak Tamil, English and Bengali. In what language do you think?

I feel like a linguistic chameleon. I like to flirt and chat in tongues; they alleviate the social fear that many have of trying a new language. I think in English, smell in Tamil and flirt in Bengali.

What does the Booker International gain from sand tomb does it mean to you as a beginner literary translator in India?

Spectacular victories in all areas are extremely inspiring. Arundhati Roy’s victory convinced Indian writers that their English was recognized by the world. Likewise, the victory of Geetajanli Shree gives hope to many translators of Indian languages. I have been at the pearly gates for a vision of AK Ramanujam after his extraordinary translations of Sangam literature ever since I read it in college. For a beginner like me, it offers the courage to dream in translations.

Arunima Mazumdar is a freelance writer. She is @sermoninstone on Twitter and @sermonsinstone on Instagram.

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NBCUniversal News Group and WK Kellogg Foundation partner to support racial healing https://anglomir.net/nbcuniversal-news-group-and-wk-kellogg-foundation-partner-to-support-racial-healing/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 19:11:31 +0000 https://anglomir.net/nbcuniversal-news-group-and-wk-kellogg-foundation-partner-to-support-racial-healing/ June 30, 2022 Contact: Lorie AcioNBCUniversal NewsgroupLorie.Acio@nbcuni.com neil srokaWK Kellogg FoundationNeil.sroka@wkkf.org MSNBC and Noticias Telemundo to Air Multi-Platform Bilingual Town Hall on National Racial Healing Day on January 17, 2023 NBCU News Group to produce 14-part digital series Year-long initiative kicks off at Aspen Ideas Festival with conversations about racial equity ASPEN […]]]>

June 30, 2022



Contact:

Lorie Acio
NBCUniversal Newsgroup
Lorie.Acio@nbcuni.com

neil sroka
WK Kellogg Foundation
Neil.sroka@wkkf.org

MSNBC and Noticias Telemundo to Air Multi-Platform Bilingual Town Hall on National Racial Healing Day on January 17, 2023

NBCU News Group to produce 14-part digital series

Year-long initiative kicks off at Aspen Ideas Festival with conversations about racial equity

ASPEN (June 30, 2022) – NBCUniversal News Group and the WK Kellogg Foundation (WKKF) have entered into an editorial collaboration to promote dialogue around racial equity issues and help advance racial healing.

Drawing on WKKF’s vast experience and expertise, the year-long initiative will introduce racial healing to a wider audience, illustrate how racial healing is already producing transformative results across the United States, and inspire everyday people to work for racial healing and racial equity in their community. It will also draw on the News Group’s extensive collection of leading media and journalists to elevate stories focused on racial healing.

Throughout the year, the News Group will engage the country’s leading voices through coverage to promote racial healing, develop year-round digital content, and produce a town hall in English and French. Spanish on National Day for Racial Healing on January 17, 2023.

The annual “National Racial Healing Day” celebration was created with and builds on the work and learnings of the WK Kellogg Foundation’s Truth, Racial Healing and Transformation (TRHT) community partners. TRHT was established in 2017 to promote racial healing as a critical path to ending racial prejudice and creating a society where all children can thrive. It is a national and community-based process designed to bring transformational and lasting change to communities, while addressing the historical and contemporary effects of racism. National Racial Healing Day is held annually on the Tuesday following Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

“We are pleased to partner with the WK Kellogg Foundation in an effort to recognize the racism that is rampant in our society and to help build solidarity,” said Yvette Miley, SVP, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, NBCUniversal News Group. “It’s a journalistic responsibility to not only inform our audience, but also to elevate the resources and tools available to help address these issues.”

“Racial healing is a process that restores the integrity of individuals and communities, repairs the damage caused by racism, and transforms societal structures into those that affirm the value of all,” said The June Montgomery Tabron, President and CEO of the WK Kellogg Foundation. “We must take into account the unignorable and long-standing realities of racial injustice, forged over generations. The collective outcry to change a long-broken status quo, the ongoing racial violence across the country, and the continuing disproportionate struggle with the impact of the COVID crisis – underscore the need for racial healing and renew our commitment to the racial equity, together.

Starting next month, reporters from NBC News, MSNBC, CNBC and Noticias Telemundo will explore and report on the topic of racial equity through the lens of racial healing. This will include profiles and investigations through a 14-part digital series on NBCNews.com. The digital series will explore central themes of racial healing, including the progress individuals and communities have made in acknowledging racism in our history, acknowledging everyday biases, and repairing our society by building inclusive relationships and transforming systems and the structures.

On National Day for Racial Healing on January 17, 2023, the News Group will present a town hall featuring a diverse group of community leaders and experts in race relations, public policy and the law. The event will be broadcast on the MSNBC and Noticias Telemundo platforms in English and Spanish. CNBC will feature excerpts from the town hall that highlight economic inequality.

The year-long initiative kicked off today at the Aspen Ideas Festival, where the News Group and WKKF hosted special sessions that examine America’s history of individual and systemic racism, as evidenced in the murder of George Floyd and anti-Semites, anti-AAPI, and anti-Latin American Hate Crimes and explore a path to bridging communities.

About NBCUniversal News Group

More Americans watch NBC News, MSNBC and CNBC than any news agency in the world. NBC News’ major award-winning television news shows include TODAY, NBC Nightly News with Lester Holt, Meet the Press with Chuck Todd and Dateline NBC. MSNBC is the #2 network on all of cable and is the premier destination for breaking news, award-winning content, in-depth analysis and insightful insights. CNBC is the recognized global leader in business news, providing real-time coverage of financial markets, business and general news content, and prime-time reality television programming, consumed by more than 557 million people per month across all platforms. The rapidly growing NBC News digital group, including its streaming news services NBC News NOW and TODAY All Day, and the network’s award-winning Original Podcast and Audio Unit deliver ongoing content to consumers wherever they are , whenever they want.

NBC News, MSNBC and CNBC are part of the NBCUniversal News Group, a division of NBCUniversal, which is owned by Comcast Corporation. For more information about NBCUniversal, please visit NBCUniversal.com.

About the WK Kellogg Foundation

The WK Kellogg Foundation (WKKF), founded in 1930 as an independent private foundation by innovator and entrepreneur Will Keith Kellogg, is one of the largest philanthropic foundations in the United States. Guided by the belief that all children should have an equal opportunity to thrive, the Kellogg Foundation works with communities to create conditions for vulnerable children so they can achieve their full potential in school, work and life. in life.

Based in Battle Creek, Michigan, the Kellogg Foundation works in the United States and internationally, as well as with sovereign tribes. Particular attention is given to priority locations where there are high concentrations of poverty and where children face significant barriers to success. WKKF priority locations in the United States are Michigan, Mississippi, New Mexico and New Orleans; and internationally, are in Mexico and Haiti.

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Pedro Almódovar teams up with Pedro Pascal and Ethan Hawke for upcoming English language film https://anglomir.net/pedro-almodovar-teams-up-with-pedro-pascal-and-ethan-hawke-for-upcoming-english-language-film/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:54:46 +0000 https://anglomir.net/pedro-almodovar-teams-up-with-pedro-pascal-and-ethan-hawke-for-upcoming-english-language-film/ The western is back, thanks to writers like Jane Campion and, now, Pedro Almódovar. While chatting with IndieWire about his career, the Parallel mothers The director has revealed plans for his next film, a quick 30-minute getaway with two star actors. Pedro Pascal and Ethan Hawke have been selected to direct Strange way of lifea […]]]>

The western is back, thanks to writers like Jane Campion and, now, Pedro Almódovar. While chatting with IndieWire about his career, the Parallel mothers The director has revealed plans for his next film, a quick 30-minute getaway with two star actors.

Pedro Pascal and Ethan Hawke have been selected to direct Strange way of lifea western filmed in the same Spanish city as The good the bad and the ugly. Although most of Almódovar’s films are in Spanish, this new short will be shot in English, like his recent foray The human voicewhich starred Tilda Swinton.

Although Almódovar did not reveal too much about Strange way of life, he teased that the characters of Hawke and Pascal seem to be at odds; the first is a sheriff and the second is a gunslinger. After living on opposite sides of the desert for 25 years, one of them decides to stalk the other in the vast expanses of sand of the Wild West.

“There will be a confrontation between them, but the story is really very intimate,” Almodóvar said. He also suggested the film was his “answer” to Brokeback Mountain, but did not reveal whether or not the film is romantic. “You can guess. I mean, masculinity is one of the things in the movie.

We will take this for a “yes”, especially after the touching, intimate Almodóvar pain and glory. And speaking of Brokeback Mountain, the director also spoke about his involvement in this film. Before Ang Lee was hired to direct the romance, Almodóvar was in talks to direct the project.

“I think Ang Lee made a wonderful film, but I never believed they would give me complete freedom and independence to do whatever I wanted,” Almodóvar said. “No one told me that – they said, ‘You can do whatever you want’, but I knew there was a limit.”

Whereas Brokeback Mountain is perfect as it is, could you imagine the Talk to him the director’s version of the film? Good with Strange way of life along the way, we might see what a different take might have looked like.

While Pascal is finishing his filming on The last of us for HBO and Hawke is polishing his work on The black phone, which has just been released in theaters, the duo will meet its director in Spain. Unfortunately, there’s no word on a release date yet.

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Uniphore will continue to define the conversational AI market: CTO Raghavan https://anglomir.net/uniphore-will-continue-to-define-the-conversational-ai-market-cto-raghavan/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 14:15:00 +0000 https://anglomir.net/uniphore-will-continue-to-define-the-conversational-ai-market-cto-raghavan/ Over the past decade, we’ve evolved our product suite from using external AI solutions to building our own AI algorithms and services, Raghavan said. Topicsuniphora | Artificial intelligence Earlier this year, Chennai and California-based Uniphore Technologies entered the unicorn club at a $2.5 billion valuation, with a $400 million fundraising round led by […]]]>

Over the past decade, we’ve evolved our product suite from using external AI solutions to building our own AI algorithms and services, Raghavan said.

Topics
uniphora | Artificial intelligence


Earlier this year, Chennai and California-based Uniphore Technologies entered the unicorn club at a $2.5 billion valuation, with a $400 million fundraising round led by New Enterprise Associates. The company specializes in voice recognition and conversational artificial intelligence (AI). Chief Technology Officer BALAJI RAGHAVAN, in an email interaction with Shivani Shinde, explains its unique technology platform, the maturation of conversational AI, and where the company is headed. Edited excerpts:


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First published: Sunday, June 26, 2022. 7:45 p.m. IST

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SBS language | Ep.217: Culturally significant site used to test rockets and missiles https://anglomir.net/sbs-language-ep-217-culturally-significant-site-used-to-test-rockets-and-missiles/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 03:07:32 +0000 https://anglomir.net/sbs-language-ep-217-culturally-significant-site-used-to-test-rockets-and-missiles/ DOWNLOAD the script in Italian and English side by side. Italian UPSOT – WALK ON HART LAKE The anziana Kokatha Elaine Kite visits the sponde settentrionali del Lake Hart by the prima volta. Lake Hart holds deep cultural significance for the people of Kokatha, connettendole con the storie mitologiche dei loro antenati. Ma questa parte […]]]>

DOWNLOAD the script in Italian and English side by side.

Italian

UPSOT – WALK ON HART LAKE

The anziana Kokatha Elaine Kite visits the sponde settentrionali del Lake Hart by the prima volta.

Lake Hart holds deep cultural significance for the people of Kokatha, connettendole con the storie mitologiche dei loro antenati.

Ma questa parte del lago è solitamente interdetta. It sits inside the Woomera No-Go Zone, a massive military shooting hotspot in South Australia’s outback – just a little further north-west of Adelaide.

“It’s a pain that we feel in our mind. It is about what is happening in the country, we do not always see it. Standing here by the lake, there’s this feeling that we have. It’s powerful to be able to look through that, but knowing full well there’s damage out there.

UPSOT – MISSILE FIRES ON LAKE HART

The Australian Defense Force per anni si è servita di Lake Hart per collaudare missili e armamenti. The surface of the lake è stata utilizzata as zona d’impatto per esplosivi.

Questi rumori provengono da un’esercitazione di tiro a Lake Hart nel 2018.

UPSOT – GUNS SHOOT

Ora Kite raccoglie i bossoli sparati lasciati sparsi sul terreno.

“To see all the spent shells and bits, you think…wow. It’s an indication of what’s going on here when we’re not here. And when you see that, you know it’s in your spirit. It’s not good.”

Sono stati identificati diversi siti culturali importanti nell’area di Lake Hart. Vis si trovano incisioni rupestri, fondamenta di capanne in pietra utilizate per rifugio e moli usate per creare attrezzi.

The archeologo Neale Draper has dichiarato che i siti Kokatha trovati all’interno della Woomera Prohibited Area sono straordinari.

“There is a very strong need to conserve and deal with this. It is very, very important to the people of Kokatha and other peoples of the Western Desert. It’s all part of the Tjukuroa and other dream tracks that cross the Western Desert.

Secondo i internal documenti ottenuti da SBS News, the Australian Defense Force should avoid certi siti importanti dal point di vista culturale nella zona di Lake Hart.

Nonostante ciò, nel gennaio 2021 venne trovato il corpo di un Saab anti-aircraft missile nel mezzo di un’area protetta chiamata Lake Hart West. Ci vollero 12 mesi per i militari per recuperare il missile e ancora non c’è una spiegazione su come sia arrival lì.

The lawyer John Podgorelec presented a denunciation against Saab, sotto le linee guida internazionali gestite dalla OECD.

The denuncia plainly accused Saab of not aver rispettato gli obblighi di dovuta diligenza prima che il missile venice vendto all’esercito australiano e collaudato a Lake Hart.

“We’re just looking to uphold the OECD due diligence guidelines. More specifically, what this means in this case is that we are looking for measures to put in place so that the sites can be protected.

John Pace is the former secretary of the Commissione delle Nazioni Unite per i dDiritti dell’Uomo. Ritiene che il trattamento dei siti patrimonio culturale aborigine tende all’orribile.

“In this area of ​​Indigenous heritage protection, it’s remarkably in your face. Which is, in fact, a very serious matter of the devastation that is happening. »

Le ministro della Difesa ha dichiarato che Lake Hart est riconosciuto sotto un piano di gestione dei siti protetti, sviluppato insieme ai Proprietari Tradizionali.

Saab non ha volto commentare, ma in precedenza with dichiarato che la vendta di ordigni all’Australia è soggetta a stretta supervisione.

In piedi sulle rive che danno su Lake Hart, the anziano Kokatha Andrew Starkey is in preda allo sconforto. Per lui il lago è stato profanato.

“Lake Hart is quite an important area, not only for the Kokatha people, but for other people from the south, west and north. It connects us all through the Tjukurpa, through the different storylines. There There are engraving sites, there are stone works, it is a very culturally important place, it breaks our hearts to see it desecrated in this way.

English

UPSOT – WALK ON HART LAKE

Kokatha elder Elaine Kite visits the northern shores of Hart Lake for the first time.

Lake Hart holds deep cultural significance for the Kokatha people, connecting them to the stories of their ancestors.

But this part of the lake is generally prohibited. It is in the Woomera Prohibited Zone, a huge military firing range in the outback of South Australia, about six hours northwest of Adelaide.

“It’s a pain that we feel in our mind. It is about what is happening in the country, we do not always see it. Standing here by the lake, there’s this feeling that we have. It’s powerful to be able to look through that, but knowing full well there’s damage out there.

UPSOT – MISSILE FIRES ON LAKE HART

The Australian Defense Force has used Lake Hart for years to test missiles and weapons. The surface of the lake was used as an impact zone for explosives.

These sounds are from a live-fire exercise held at Lake Hart in 2018.

UPSOT – GUNS SHOOT

Now Mrs. Kite is picking up spent bullet casings left strewn on the floor.

“To see all the spent shells and bits, you think…wow. It’s an indication of what’s going on here when we’re not here. And when you see that, you know it’s in your mind. It’s not good.”

A number of significant cultural sites have been identified in the Hart Lake area. There are rock carvings, foundations of stone huts used as shelters and millstones used for tool making.

Archaeologist Neale Draper says the Kokatha sites found inside the Woomera No-Go Zone are remarkable.

“There is a very strong need to conserve and deal with this. It is very, very important to the people of Kokatha and other peoples of the Western Desert. It’s all part of the Tjukuroa and other dream tracks that cross the Western Desert.

According to internal documents obtained by SBS News, the Australian Defense Force is supposed to avoid certain culturally significant sites in the Hart Lake area.

However, in January 2021, the body of a Saab anti-aircraft missile was discovered in the middle of a heritage area called Lake Hart West. It took the military 12 months to recover the missile, and there is still no explanation as to how it got there.

Lawyer John Podgorelec is leading a complaint against Saab under international guidelines administered by the OECD.

The complaint generally alleges that Saab failed to fulfill its due diligence obligations before the missile was sold to the Australian military and tested at Lake Hart.

“We’re just looking to uphold the OECD due diligence guidelines. More specifically, what this means in this case is that we are looking for measures to put in place so that the sites can be protected.

Dr. John Pace is the former Secretary of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. He says the treatment of Aboriginal heritage sites in Australia borders on appalling.

“In this area of ​​Indigenous heritage protection, it’s remarkably in your face. Which is, in fact, a very serious matter of the devastation that is happening. »

The MoD says Hart Lake is recognized under a heritage management plan, developed with the traditional owners.

Saab declined to comment, but previously said the sale of ammunition to Australia was subject to strict oversight.

Standing on the shores of Lake Hart, Kokatha elder Andrew Starkey is in despair. He says the lake has been desecrated.

“Lake Hart is quite an important area, not only for the Kokatha people, but for other people from the south, west and north. It connects us all through the Tjukurpa, through the different storylines. There There are engraving sites, there are stone works, it is a very culturally important place, it breaks our hearts to see it desecrated in this way.

Reporting by Steven Trask

Listen to Italian SBS every day from 8am to 10am. follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

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George Lamming, famous Caribbean novelist, dies at 94 https://anglomir.net/george-lamming-famous-caribbean-novelist-dies-at-94/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 04:26:00 +0000 https://anglomir.net/george-lamming-famous-caribbean-novelist-dies-at-94/ Placeholder while loading article actions George Lamming, a Barbadian author who placed the legacy of colonialism at the center of his novels and lyrical essays, earning a reputation as one of the finest Caribbean writers of his generation, died on June 4 in a nursing home in Bridgetown, the capital of his country. He was […]]]>
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George Lamming, a Barbadian author who placed the legacy of colonialism at the center of his novels and lyrical essays, earning a reputation as one of the finest Caribbean writers of his generation, died on June 4 in a nursing home in Bridgetown, the capital of his country. He was 94 years old.

His death was announced by Mia Mottley, the Prime Minister of Barbados. “Wherever George Lamming went,” she said in a statement, “he embodied that voice and spirit that cried out in Barbados and the Caribbean.” Mr Lamming’s daughter, Natasha Lamming-Lee, said he was ill but did not name a cause.

Alongside novelists and poets such as Kamau Brathwaite, Wilson Harris, Edgar Mittelholzer, VS Naipaul, Andrew Salkey and Derek Walcott, Mr. Lamming helped define a new Caribbean literature in the mid-twentieth century, exploring questions of history , politics, language and freedom at a time when colonial rule was giving way to independence.

Raised on a former sugar cane plantation outside of Bridgetown, he has written books highlighting the experiences of people marginalized because of their race, language, gender or income, and has broadcast a message of liberation and inclusion in his essays and speeches. “I’m kind of a preacher,” he said in a 2002 interview with the Small Ax newspaper. “I am a man with a message.”

Like Naipaul and many other Caribbean writers of their generation, Mr. Lamming launched his literary career in London, where he wrote his first semi-autobiographical novel, “In the Castle of My Skin” (1953), at the age of 23 years old. He then reviewed the experience. of migration in “The Emigrants” (1954), a dark and sketchy novel about West Indian expatriates in England, and in his collection of essays “The Pleasures of Exile” (1960), which a New York Times reviewer described as “a neo-Gothic piece with arc-shaped ideas like flying buttresses.”

“My subject,” wrote Mr. Lamming in the latter, “is the migration of the West Indian writer, as a colonial and an exile, from his native kingdom, once inhabited by Caliban, to the tumultuous island of Prospero and its language.”

Mr. Lamming returned to the Caribbean for novels such as “Of Age and Innocence” (1958) and “Season of Adventure” (1960), which were set on the fictional island of San Cristobal, where ethnic African groups, Indians and Chinese were fighting. to overcome mutual suspicion while uniting against the white establishment.

It was difficult, he noted, to forge a new identity after years of colonialism. “I had always lived in the shadow of a meaning that others had given to my presence in the world”, observes an independentist leader in “Age and Innocence”, “and I had played no role in the making in this sense, like a chair that is entirely at the mercy of the idea guiding the hand of the man who builds it.

Mr. Lamming had delved into issues of race and ethnicity since the publication of his first and best-known novel. Named after verses by Walcott, “In the Castle of My Skin” shifted between third and first person while chronicling the upbringing of a young man named G, who joins his friends in fishing, diving for the coins thrown by tourists at the beach wondering how the king’s face ends up on pennies.

He also witnesses a workers’ riot, develops a dawning awareness of racial inequality (“No black boy wanted to be white, but it was also true that no black boy liked the idea of ​​being noir”) and went to Trinidad to work as a teacher. , just like Mr. Lamming did after high school.

“I tried to reconstruct the world of my childhood and adolescence,” Mr. Lamming wrote in the introduction to the 1983 edition of the novel. “It was also the world of an entire Caribbean society.”

The book won the Somerset Maugham Award for young writers in Britain and was praised by French philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre, Kenyan author Ngugi wa Thiong’o and American novelist Richard Wright, who wrote the introduction of the American edition.

Critics were also impressed: “Mr. Lamming is a poet by instinct rather than a novelist, a man with an individual and almost private approach to the English language,” wrote Orville Prescott of The Times. “His prose is poetic, sensual, imaginative, adorned with whimsical figures of speech and surprising twists of language.”

In part, Mr. Lamming’s prose style was shaped by his belief in gaining “spiritual possession of the landscape in which you live.” For him, this meant developing an understanding of the “rhythm of the wind…the smell of the sea…the texture of stone and rock”.

“They are not objects outside of you,” Caribbean Beat magazine quoted him as saying. “They are part of your consciousness.”

George William Lamming was born in Carrington Village on June 8, 1927. His parents were unmarried and he barely knew his father. Her mother was a housewife who later married a policeman.

Mr Lamming grew up during a time of social upheaval, prefiguring Barbados’ independence from Britain in 1966, and said he and his peers suffered a more psychological form of colonial cruelty than physical. “It was a terror of the mind; a daily exercise in self-harm,” he wrote in a 2002 essay. “Black against black in a battle for self-improvement.”

After winning a scholarship to the prestigious Combermere High School, he studied under the literary editor Frank Collymore, who welcomed him into his personal library and encouraged Mr. Lamming’s interest in writing poetry and of prose, publishing some of his early work in the Caribbean magazine BIM.

Mr Lamming then worked at a boarding school in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, teaching English to Hispanic students, before moving to England in 1950, sailing on the same ship as Trinidadian writer Samuel Selvon. “If I hadn’t gone to England,” he told the Washington Post in 1999, “I would have written, but you wouldn’t have heard of me.”

After working in a factory in London, Mr Lamming landed a job with the BBC Colonial Service, where he was a presenter for shows such as “Caribbean Voices”, an influential platform for West Indian writers. He also became active in the city’s literary community, meeting Dylan Thomas and other poets at the Mandrake Club in Soho.

His conversations with English writers were more about business than literature or politics, he recalls: “A very good short-story writer, always in purple velvet, advised me never to visit an editor’s office to talk business without a small gun in my pocket. He gave examples of his success in such encounters.

Mr. Lamming was soon traveling abroad, visiting the United States on a Guggenheim Fellowship and speaking in 1956 at the Congress of Black Writers and Artists in Paris, where he impressed an audience that included James Baldwin and Frantz Fanon.

“Lamming is big, boned, messy, and intense,” Baldwin wrote in an essay on the event, “and one of his real distinctions is his refusal to be bullied into being a real writer. “

With his booming, gravelly voice and crown of graying hair, Mr. Lamming won a wide range of admirers, including Canadian novelist and short-story writer Margaret Laurence. They had a brief affair, according to her biographer James King, and she moved to London with her children in an unsuccessful attempt to settle down with Mr Lamming. (His only marriage, to artist Nina Ghent, had previously ended in divorce.)

By 1967, Mr. Lamming had launched a career in academia, lecturing and working as a writer-in-residence at schools including Brown, Duke, Penn, the University of Texas at Austin and the University of the West Indies in Jamaica. . He returned to Barbados in 1980 and lived for many years at the Atlantis Hotel near the fishing village of Bathsheba, where he said his writing was invigorated by daily swims in the ocean.

Mr. Lamming received the Order of the Caribbean Community in 2008 and a Lifetime Achievement Honor from the Anisfield-Wolf Book Awards in 2014.

In addition to his daughter, Lamming-Lee of Silver Spring, Md., survivors include his longtime companion, Esther Phillips; seven grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren. Her son, Gordon, died last year.

Mr Lamming’s later novels include ‘Water With Berries’ (1971), a political allegory centered on a West Indian revolutionary living in London, and ‘Natives of My Person’ (1972), about 16th century explorers and the origins of the colonialism. Towards the end of his life, he was working on a book about Christopher Columbus, imagining that the explorer had been arrested and tried by an indigenous community in the West Indies.

He spent years working on the project, but in a 2002 interview with Caribbean Beat he declined to say when it might be released: “The thing is, with these things, you never end.”

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Two San Diego tribes to receive $300,000 in funding to support language preservation https://anglomir.net/two-san-diego-tribes-to-receive-300000-in-funding-to-support-language-preservation/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 21:32:35 +0000 https://anglomir.net/two-san-diego-tribes-to-receive-300000-in-funding-to-support-language-preservation/ More than $300,000 is being awarded to two tribes in San Diego County by the Department of the Interior to support tribal language preservation efforts, the department announced Wednesday. With its Living Languages ​​Grant Program, the Bureau of Indian Affairs for Indian Economic Development has awarded $7 million in grants to 45 tribes across the […]]]>

More than $300,000 is being awarded to two tribes in San Diego County by the Department of the Interior to support tribal language preservation efforts, the department announced Wednesday.

With its Living Languages ​​Grant Program, the Bureau of Indian Affairs for Indian Economic Development has awarded $7 million in grants to 45 tribes across the country to teach and preserve their languages, many of which are threatened with extinction. In San Diego, the Manzanita Band of the Kumeyaay Nation in East County will receive $129,337, and the Pala Band of Mission Indians in North County will receive $192,461.

“Indigenous preservation and language revitalization is a critical priority because languages ​​are central to a tribe’s unique cultural identities, traditions, spiritual beliefs and self-reliance,” said Bryan Newland.

Newland is Assistant Secretary of the Office of Indian and Ojibwe Affairs at the Bay Mills Indian Community in Michigan.

Thanks to decades of forced assimilation efforts in the 1800s, many Indigenous languages ​​have been pushed to the brink of extinction over the past two centuries. The Civilization Fund Act of 1819, in particular, had a strong impact on the traditional dialects, which provided funds for missionaries and church leaders to teach native students English and Christianity as a replacement for their cultural practices.

It was not until the Native American Languages ​​Act was passed in 1990 that native languages ​​were encouraged to be taught in tribal schools.

For the past six months, the Pala reservation has hosted nearly a dozen classes each week for the tribe’s native language, Cupeño, which students can participate in virtually via Zoom, said project manager Sierra Kriss. of the Pala Learning Center.

Traditionally known as Pa’enixily, the language is considered dormant because the last native speaker and author of the Cupeño oral history and language book “Mulu’wetam: First Peoples”, Rosinda Nolasquez, died in 1987.

Funding from this grant will be used to continue to pay Pala’s four language teachers and to provide educational materials like flash cards and games to tribe members that will encourage families to learn together. Having tools for family members to study together is an important aspect of language revitalization.

“Being on a reserve has its differences from city life,” Kriss said. “Most importantly for the children, these lessons give them a sense of belonging and the feeling that ‘I am a native and I have the right to know my mother tongue’. Being able to have that exposure to what their grandparents or great-grandparents said adds an extra sense of belonging in a world where they don’t always feel like they belong.

A total of $835,545 is awarded to five other California tribes. These are the Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians in Riverside County, the North Fork Rancheria of the Mono Indians of California in Madera County, the Kashia Band of Pomo Indians of the Stewarts Point Rancheria in Sonoma, Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California near Lake Tahoe and Wiyot Tribe of Humboldt County.

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Shakespeare in the Park will present its very first performance translated into British Sign Language https://anglomir.net/shakespeare-in-the-park-will-present-its-very-first-performance-translated-into-british-sign-language/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 07:08:58 +0000 https://anglomir.net/shakespeare-in-the-park-will-present-its-very-first-performance-translated-into-british-sign-language/ “Hamlet” in Lichfield will be translated into British Sign Language this year by Rebecca Palmer. Submitted by Lucy Elizabeth Dufaye This year, Shakespeare in the Park, Lichfield will aim to make theater and Shakespeare in particular even more inclusive by staging their first-ever performance translated into British Sign Language (BSL). The performance will take place […]]]>

“Hamlet” in Lichfield will be translated into British Sign Language this year by Rebecca Palmer.

Submitted by Lucy Elizabeth Dufaye

This year, Shakespeare in the Park, Lichfield will aim to make theater and Shakespeare in particular even more inclusive by staging their first-ever performance translated into British Sign Language (BSL).

The performance will take place on Saturday June 25 with BSL translator, Rebecca Palmer, a 17-year-old student from Stafford.

What makes this even more remarkable is that the play is ‘Hamlet’, it is staged in the middle of a wooded glade.

Rebecca is a 13th year Music Technology student studying at Birmingham Ormiston Academy (BOA).

As well as being a talented musician and producer, she is also a highly skilled British Sign Language translator. She said: “I started learning sign language in primary school when I was nine – learning BSL levels 1 and 2 with my mum and two of my sisters.

“I completely fell in love with the language and was blessed with an amazing teacher: Fletch@BSL who is an extremely talented sign/song performer in the deaf community. Seeing her perform from an early age really inspired me and fueled my passion for signed performances in both theater and music.

“Hamlet” in Lichfield will be translated into British Sign Language this year by Rebecca Palmer.

Rebecca is one of the youngest (if not the youngest) to pass BSL Level 3 which she learned in 2018-19 at the Walsall Deaf Community Centre. She is currently studying BSL level 6 (diploma equivalent) with the Sandwell Deaf Community Centre, which involves learning and immersing herself in Deaf culture as well as the language itself.

Rebecca’s only BSL theater acting experience so far is performing for the 2022 Rainbow Pantomimes production of “Beauty and the Beast”, where she signed both the dialogue and the songs.

Rebecca said: “It was great fun. And I loved adapting the songs to find different meanings depending on the story and the audience. I also enjoyed the use of expression and movement, mimicking the dance and comedic element of panto.

Rebecca is thrilled to perform alongside Shakespeare in the Park and can’t wait to be on stage in such a beautiful venue at Maple Hayes Hall.

The language of Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” will present many challenges. BSL has its own grammar, its own sentence structure and its own vocabulary. Rebecca will need to use modern English text to cross-reference and translate the meaning of text instead of text script.

BSL concepts and meanings are displayed visually with the subject based in the center of the sentence. For example, the famous line “To be or not to be that is the question” would be signed “future live, die which, me wonder”.

Rebecca says: “It’s going to be a huge challenge translating and performing ‘Hamlet’ but I hope I can rise to the challenge. I’m so honored to have such an amazing opportunity and I’m super excited to play alongside an amazing group of people.

This year’s production runs from June 22 to June 25 and tickets can be purchased here.


Get all the latest news, updates, things to do and more from Lichfield, Staffordshire’s dedicated InYourArea feed.


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Hartford parents demand more language services in schools https://anglomir.net/hartford-parents-demand-more-language-services-in-schools/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 22:05:00 +0000 https://anglomir.net/hartford-parents-demand-more-language-services-in-schools/ HARTFORD, CT (WFSB) – Some parents in Hartford want the city’s public school district to do more to support language equity. Their demands include things like more translations and services for non-English speaking parents. 85 different languages ​​are spoken in Hartford public schools. A protest took place outside the school district’s central office on Monday. […]]]>

HARTFORD, CT (WFSB) – Some parents in Hartford want the city’s public school district to do more to support language equity.

Their demands include things like more translations and services for non-English speaking parents.

85 different languages ​​are spoken in Hartford public schools.

A protest took place outside the school district’s central office on Monday.

Parents want the school district to hire more translators.

The school district said it was doing what it could to support families.

“I want them to have better interpreting and language services for parents of other languages ​​who don’t speak English,” said Hartford parent Leida Ramos.

Ramos is a mother of three and a volunteer for Make the Road Connecticut.

The group is asking the school district to have more in-person interpreters.

“It’s very important for a parent to be involved in their children’s school and education,” Ramos said.

The group demonstrated outside the Hartford Public Schools Central Offices on Monday morning.

“We want all immigrant parents to communicate in their language with teachers, nurses, directors. And we want them to understand what’s going on in their child’s education,” said Megan Scharrer, Hartford community organizer with Make the Road Connecticut.

85 different languages ​​are spoken in the 39 schools in the district.

Superintendent Dr. Leslie Torres-Rodriguez said families can request translations for school meetings.

“As a bilingual, biliterate and bicultural person, it’s very important to me to make sure that families have access to it and I myself became the translator during our town halls for example,” said Torres-Rodriguez.

She added that a language line is available for families in addition to other resources.

“We actually have a web tool called parent square, and families have the ability to select in their settings which language the content should be translated into,” Torres-Rodriguez said.

A reminder for parents on how to change language settings for district written communications was recently sent.

“It’s a challenge. It’s a balance. We want to make sure we leverage the diversity that we have. Inclusion means so much to us. We want all of our families to be seen and heard,” Torres-Rodriguez . Said.

The superintendent said parents who are concerned about language resources can contact their child’s school for more information. The neighborhood also has a visitor center.

Hartford Public Schools released a statement on the protest:

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Language matters, especially for our children https://anglomir.net/language-matters-especially-for-our-children/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 21:27:59 +0000 https://anglomir.net/language-matters-especially-for-our-children/ I recently sat down at a table with a well-known politician. He said: “All men between the ages of 22 and 50 should work.” I knew his intent: We as Americans should value a culture of hard work. I turned to my friend and colleague, an older white man, and said, “Did he really just […]]]>

I recently sat down at a table with a well-known politician. He said: “All men between the ages of 22 and 50 should work.” I knew his intent: We as Americans should value a culture of hard work.

I turned to my friend and colleague, an older white man, and said, “Did he really just say only men should work? My friend said, “Come on, Deeptee, you know what he meant.” Even my husband said I was too particular and primed through my feminist lens.

Maybe this politician meant, “Everyone between the ages of 22 and 50 should work. But, I am worried about what my 2 year old daughter would have heard. Did she hear the politician say that women might not have the same aspirations as men? Has she heard that women are not welcome in the job market? Or don’t belong?

As a spine surgeon, entrepreneur, and mom, I sit at many different tables. We all know that gender stereotypes exist, that men are promoted more often than women and that the pay gap is real. In 2020, the Pew Research Center determined that women earn 84 cents for every dollar men are paid even when working equivalent jobs.

If we want to change that, I support: language matters. English was created in a society rooted in stereotypical gender norms and as such gender asymmetries, and specifically male generics, are common. For example, the pronoun “he” can be used when gender is irrelevant or unknown. The feminine forms, however, are not used generically and refer specifically to women only. The use of masculine generics is just another tribute to our society’s gender hierarchy, which grants more power to men than to women. As we move towards a more gender equal society, we need to change our language. Gender-just language aims to reduce gender stereotyping and discrimination through neutralization, such as the use of the term “police officer” instead of “policeman”.

Here are three tables we sit at every day where we can pay attention to our language to create spaces and conversations that foster ambition and inclusivity among our colleagues and our children, and everyone in between.

Your office

One of the surgical planners sent an email to all of the nursing staff on our ward stating “Please ask your surgeon if he would like any additional OR time in the next few weeks”. Now it’s true, most of the surgeons in our service are “he”. I am the only female spine surgeon and one of the few female orthopedic surgeons in my department.

I’m sure the sender of the email had no malicious intent when sending the email. I’m looking at this sentence in the historical context of the English language, perhaps using the word “he” as a generic pronoun. However, especially in the context of a service composed of more than 90% male surgeons, such language has the effect of excluding female surgeons. These same comments apply to any organization with a dominant majority – eg managers, investors, service industries.

When emailing, think critically about how you communicate with your colleagues. The use of neutral pronouns avoids excluding the gender minority population in the group and promotes a sense of belonging.

The panel/dais

Often when I attend women-specific events, whether panels or conferences, I frequently lead a session on “work-life balance.” I also get many phone calls from aspiring surgeons asking what it is like to be a surgeon and a mother. In contrast, I go to many conferences with mostly men, and we never discuss parenting or household chores. And I don’t seem to be getting those calls from aspiring male surgeons.

These conversations are indeed essential, especially in our post-COVID world. However, there is often a female-specific character, for example, the need for working women to outsource cleaning. Superficially, these conversations appear to be well-meaning efforts to free women from the mundane chores of the home. But they are fundamentally anchored by the same restrictive, normative and stereotypical gender assumptions: domestic work and childcare are inherently women’s jobs.

We need to change the narrative. I argue that these conversations are important for everyone, men and women. I applaud those who, like my male partner, asked me last week to lead a discussion on this topic at a national conference of mostly men. Let’s move these discussions to be more mainstream and remove the stigma surrounding work-life balance issues as a female-only topic.

The dinner table at home

My two-year-old daughter and I spend most of our evenings at the table reading books while enjoying our meals together. Perhaps my experiences as one of more than 50 female orthopedic spine surgeons in the country, combined with my mother tiger instincts, have made me hyper-aware of any suggestions that discourage my daughter from pursuing her dreams, whatever they are.

As we read aloud from one of Richard Scarry’s books, we found that, page after page, every working professional except the nurse and the hairdresser was portrayed as a male figure. When we finally came across a page that said “A mother’s job is never done” followed by drawings of the mother vacuuming, I had to close the cover on this classic childhood favorite.

Since then, I have discovered many other encouraging modern books that illustrate women changing the world. But nevertheless, I also learned that the images depicted in this book by Richard Scarry are still carried by children today. The 7 year old daughter of one of the nurses I work with was shocked when she learned that her mother worked with a female surgeon.

Thinking back to the words of this politician – I want my daughter to have the luxury of making career choices when the time is right for her – whether it’s a full-time parent or a senior executive. If she grows up with a mindset framed by normative gender stereotypes, she won’t have the freedom to make those choices, because she won’t believe she can. As such, as a culture, we need to be mindful of the specific words and language children hear. I hope that as my daughter grows, our culture will continue to evolve not only to support her ambitions but also to nurture them by making her believe that she can achieve anything she wants.

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