English dialects – Anglomir http://anglomir.net/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 16:22:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://anglomir.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-2-120x120.png English dialects – Anglomir http://anglomir.net/ 32 32 Wilko Johnson, British guitarist for Dr Feelgood, dies at 75 https://anglomir.net/wilko-johnson-british-guitarist-for-dr-feelgood-dies-at-75/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 16:22:00 +0000 https://anglomir.net/wilko-johnson-british-guitarist-for-dr-feelgood-dies-at-75/ Wilko Johnson, the British guitarist who founded the incendiary 1970s blues-rock band Dr. Feelgood, recorded with singer Roger Daltrey of The Who and played mute executioner Ilyn Payne on the HBO series “Game of Thrones,” died on November 21 at his home in Westcliff-on-Sea, south-east England. He was 75 years old. He was diagnosed with […]]]>

Wilko Johnson, the British guitarist who founded the incendiary 1970s blues-rock band Dr. Feelgood, recorded with singer Roger Daltrey of The Who and played mute executioner Ilyn Payne on the HBO series “Game of Thrones,” died on November 21 at his home in Westcliff-on-Sea, south-east England. He was 75 years old.

He was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2013 and later underwent experimental surgery. His death was announced on his social network media sites.

Offstage, Mr Johnson seemed a most unlikely rock star – a former English teacher specializing in medieval literature and Icelandic sagas, an acquaintance that probably served him well when he was cast in ‘Game of Thrones”.

In HBO’s sword and fantasy series, Mr Johnson portrayed Ser Ilyn Payne, a royal executioner rendered mute after his tongue was removed on orders from the Mad King. Although Mr Johnson had never acted before, he said he found the job easy.

“They said they wanted someone really sinister who looked at people with daggers before killing them,” he told a British reporter. “Staring at people with a dagger is what I do all the time, it’s like second nature to me.”

Indeed, his quartet, Dr. Feelgood, masters a raw and uncompromising style. His music – an amped-up, high-energy take on Chicago blues and early rock and roll fueled by Mr. Johnson’s hyper-aggressive guitar work – anticipated the intensity of British punk bands such as the Clash and the Sex Pistols.

“The words came to you like a blowtorch Chuck Berry,” music writer Nick Coleman once joked.

On stage, Mr Johnson cultivated an eccentric appearance, moving back and forth in time to the beat of the music with robotic precision. He wore ratty black Nehru jackets and always sported a scruffy pudding bowl haircut.

His guitar technique was striking – literally. He struck the guitar in an up-and-down motion with no pick, his right hand – the strumming hand – positioned like a crab’s claw. Early in his career, the fingers of this hand were bleeding bare flesh hitting the strings. A red pickguard hid the blood.

(Decades later, when his guitarist son Simon imitated the style and got the same bloody hand after playing, Mr Johnson told a reporter: “I was proud to see him bleed in the name of rock ‘n’ ‘ roll.”)

With Dr. Feelgood, Mr. Johnson’s captivating presence was matched by that of Lee Brilleaux, the band’s vocalist and harmonica player, who often seemed ready to burst into violence on stage.

Mr Johnson often wrote for Brilleaux’s gruff, staccato voice, such as with the opening words of ‘All Through the City’, which depicts a working-class industrial tableau of fires from chimneys: “Stand up and watch the towers burn at the day break.”

Mr Johnson and his mates grew up near the oil and gas terminals of Canvey Island, commonly known as ‘Oil City’, an island in the Thames Estuary. They recorded their first album in 1975 and became part of the mid-1970s British musical movement known as pub rock. Like the punk scene to follow, pub rockers kept their music at street level, preferring small clubs to gigging arenas.

The band proved hugely popular in England with hits such as ‘Sneakin’ Suspicion’, ‘Roxette’ and ‘All Through the City’. Mr Johnson wrote and co-wrote many of the songs and also created the band’s distinctive logo of a smiling man wearing sunglasses.

Behind the scenes, the group was torn with tension. Mr Johnson said he used amphetamines but was abstinent, which set him apart from his heavy-drinking bandmates. “And it’s come to a situation,” he told the Essex Chronicle, “where I’m in my room trying to write songs and they’re all at the bar drinking a glass.”

His bandmates fired him in 1977 while recording their fourth album, and he said he was “devastated” to have been separated from people he considered family. During this time, Dr. Feelgood was overshadowed by the punk scene he helped energize. Brilleaux died in 1994 of lymphoma. Mr Johnson’s role in the band was highlighted in the 2009 documentary ‘Oil City Confidential’, part of director Julien Temple’s trilogy of films about British punk.

After leaving Dr Feelgood, Mr Johnson split his time between leading his own trio and performing with Ian Dury and the Blockheads, who he joined in 1980. (Dury, known for mixing Cockney dialect humor with funk and reggae beats, died in 2000.)

In 2013, Mr Johnson announced he had terminal pancreatic cancer and an upcoming tour would be his last. He then recorded the album “Going Back Home” with former Who singer Daltrey and did a second farewell tour with him.

In concert, Mr Johnson pointed to what he called “the baby” – a large lump protruding from his lower abdomen – while Daltrey held his microphone to the guitarist’s stomach.

John Peter Wilkinson, whose father was a gas fitter, was born on July 12, 1947 in Canvey Island. He graduated with a degree in English Literature from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne and in 1971 joined the Pigboy Charlie Band, a band that became Dr Feelgood. The new name was taken from a 1962 blues hop by Piano Red.

His wife, Irene Knight, died in 2004. Survivors include two sons, Simon and Matthew, and a grandson.

Following his cancer diagnosis, Mr Johnson described a newfound serenity.

“You walk with a different consciousness,” Mr Johnson told the Observer, a British publication. “You look at other people and think they’re all living under this terrible threat of mortality. For me though, it’s settled, and that sets me apart.

He added: “I’m not going to pull out a book of sayings, though.”

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Speak gets investment from OpenAI to expand its language learning platform TechCrunch https://anglomir.net/speak-gets-investment-from-openai-to-expand-its-language-learning-platform-techcrunch/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 16:01:19 +0000 https://anglomir.net/speak-gets-investment-from-openai-to-expand-its-language-learning-platform-techcrunch/ Speak, an English learning platform with AI-powered features, today announced that it has raised $27 million in a Series B funding round led by OpenAI Startup Fund, featuring Lachy Groom, Josh Buckley, Justin Mateen, Gokul Rajaram and Founders Fund. Notably, Speak is the third startup in which OpenAI, the AI ​​lab closely aligned with Microsoft, […]]]>

Speak, an English learning platform with AI-powered features, today announced that it has raised $27 million in a Series B funding round led by OpenAI Startup Fund, featuring Lachy Groom, Josh Buckley, Justin Mateen, Gokul Rajaram and Founders Fund. Notably, Speak is the third startup in which OpenAI, the AI ​​lab closely aligned with Microsoft, has invested publicly through its fund – the others being Descript and Mem.

OpenAI Startup Fund participants receive early access to new OpenAI systems and Azure resources from Microsoft in addition to capital.

“We are very pleased to partner with the outstanding team at Speak, who are well positioned to deliver this powerful generative AI application – making language learning efficient and accessible,” Brad Lightcap, COO of OpenAI and Manager of the OpenAI Startup Fund, said in a statement. “Speak has the potential to revolutionize not just language learning, but education more broadly, and this aligns with the OpenAI Startup Fund’s goal of accelerating the impact of powerful AI. to improve people’s lives.”

Speak was founded in 2016 by Connor Zwick and Andrew Hsu, who both had a keen interest in AI from an early age. Hsu has a background in health, having earned a doctorate in neuroscience at Stanford before joining Zwick to co-launch Speak. Zwick comes from the information technology industry – he sold his first startup, flashcard app Flashcards+, to Chegg in 2013 after dropping out of Harvard.

Zwick and Hsu met through The Thiel Fellowship originally, with Hsu being in the first cohort and Zwick in the second. (Note that Founders Fund, which Thiel co-founded, pledged money for Speak’s Series B.) Before starting Speak, the two spent a year studying and researching machine learning and developing algorithms. accent detection using YouTube videos as training data.

“Most language learning software can help with early learning basic vocabulary and grammar, but gaining a degree of fluency requires speaking out loud in an interactive environment,” Zwick told TechCrunch. in an email interview. “To date, the only way people can get this kind of practice is through human tutors, which can also be expensive, difficult and intimidating.”

Picture credits: Talk

Speak’s solution is a collection of interactive speaking experiences that allow learners to practice conversing in English. Through the platform, users can hold open conversations with an “AI tutor” on a range of topics while receiving feedback on their pronunciation, grammar and vocabulary.

The premise may resemble Duolingo and some of the other AI-based language learning apps like Yanadoo, ELSA, and Loora. But Zwick insists that Speak’s AI technology is superior to most.

“Under the hood, we combine the latest in OpenAI with in-house models to deliver the best performance in speech recognition, speech generation, and conversation generation,” he said. “We’re able to provide feedback on things like pronunciation and more natural vocabulary and syntax by using [our] patterns … We accumulate a substantial dataset of second-language labeled speaking examples, which allows us to uniquely provide state-of-the-art speech patterns for foreign accented speakers.

Whether this is true is up for debate. Speak has not provided any empirical data showing that its platform outperforms its rivals. But what is talking Is clearly his precocious momentum. It is one of Korea’s top educational apps on the iOS App Store, with over 15 million lessons started every year, 100,000 active subscribers, and “double-digit” annual recurring revenue.

Speak offers auto-renewing monthly and annual subscriptions, both of which provide access to courses, electives, and review content in addition to AI-guided practice sessions.

For Speak’s next act, the company plans to expand into new languages ​​and markets, including Japan, and invest in features that leverage text generation models like GPT-3. OpenAI.

“The pandemic has accelerated remote working and the expansion of global and distributed teams, which means there are even more demands for people around the world to speak the same language. It has also spurred demand for new solutions more geared toward remote or programmatic experiences as opposed to in-person instruction. Zwick added. “Speak has remained fairly lean and has several years of trail allowing him to control his own destiny regardless of the fundraising environment over the next few years.”

Currently, Speak has 40 employees spread across offices in San Francisco (its headquarters), Seoul and Ljubljana, Slovenia. Zwick says the new funding, which brings Speak’s total raised to “just over” $47 million, will be dedicated to expanding the engineering, machine learning, product, marketing, content and business operations.

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Utah Jazz and Mark Miller Subaru to Unveil New Computer Lab in Taylorsville on November 11 https://anglomir.net/utah-jazz-and-mark-miller-subaru-to-unveil-new-computer-lab-in-taylorsville-on-november-11/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 20:03:00 +0000 https://anglomir.net/utah-jazz-and-mark-miller-subaru-to-unveil-new-computer-lab-in-taylorsville-on-november-11/ Nearly $30,000 was donated to renovate a computer lab and purchase the Renaissance 2.0 Language Lab System with 36 stations for West Lake STEM students where 25 different languages ​​are spoken among its multilingual student learners. Many students find it difficult to live in a new country, to understand an unfamiliar language and to adapt […]]]>

Nearly $30,000 was donated to renovate a computer lab and purchase the Renaissance 2.0 Language Lab System with 36 stations for West Lake STEM students where 25 different languages ​​are spoken among its multilingual student learners. Many students find it difficult to live in a new country, to understand an unfamiliar language and to adapt to new expectations. The new school equipment and language lab will accelerate language acquisition in the areas of reading, writing, listening and speaking, especially since approximately 70% of students at West Lake STEM are studying English as a second language.

“Mark Miller Subaru is proud of our long-standing partnership with the Utah Jazz and is truly honored to stand alongside them in making this significant financial contribution to West Lake Jr. High School,” said Jeff Miller, owner of Mark Miller Subaru. “We hope this investment in advanced classroom technology will help English language learners at West Lake Junior High while simultaneously connecting students from diverse backgrounds and cultures to each other in a way that is both powerful and that will change their lives.”

The Subaru Jazz and Mark Miller support education as one of their community pillars. The organizations have jointly adopted West Lake STEM and will bring three more activations to the school during the 2022-23 jazz season.

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Guangzhou lockdown: Chinese criticize zero-Covid – in language censors don’t seem to understand https://anglomir.net/guangzhou-lockdown-chinese-criticize-zero-covid-in-language-censors-dont-seem-to-understand/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 06:27:00 +0000 https://anglomir.net/guangzhou-lockdown-chinese-criticize-zero-covid-in-language-censors-dont-seem-to-understand/ hong kong CNN — In many countries, swearing against the government online is so commonplace that no one takes a stab at it. But it’s not such an easy task on China’s heavily censored internet. That doesn’t seem to have stopped Guangzhou residents from venting their frustration after their city – a global manufacturing powerhouse […]]]>


hong kong
CNN

In many countries, swearing against the government online is so commonplace that no one takes a stab at it. But it’s not such an easy task on China’s heavily censored internet.

That doesn’t seem to have stopped Guangzhou residents from venting their frustration after their city – a global manufacturing powerhouse home to 19 million people – became the epicenter of a nationwide Covid outbreak, again prompting lockdown measures. .

“We had to close in April and then again in November,” a resident said on Weibo, China’s restricted version of Twitter, on Monday, before peppering the post with profanity that included references to officials’ mothers. “Government didn’t provide subsidies – do you think my rent doesn’t cost money?”

Other users left messages with instructions that loosely translate to “go to hell”, while some accused the authorities of “talking nonsense” – albeit in less polite wording.

These colorful posts are notable not only because they represent growing public frustration with China’s relentless zero Covid policy – which uses instant lockdowns, mass testing, extensive contact tracing and quarantines to eradicate infections as soon as they appear – but because they remain visible at all.

Normally, such harsh criticism of government policies would be quickly suppressed by the government’s army of censors, but these posts remained untouched for days. And that’s probably because they’re written in language that few censors will fully understand.

These messages are in Cantonese, native to Guangdong Province, Guangzhou, and spoken by tens of millions of people in southern China. It can be difficult to decipher by speakers of Mandarin – China’s official language and one favored by the government – especially in its written and often complex slang forms.

And it seems to be just the latest example of how the Chinese are turning to Cantonese – an irreverent language that offers rich opportunities for satire – to express their displeasure with their government without attracting the attention of all-seeing censors. .

Masked people line up for Covid-19 tests in Beijing, China on November 10.

In September this year, the US-based independent media watchdog China Digital Times noted that many disgruntled Cantonese posts were passing censors in response to mass Covid testing requirements in Guangdong.

“Maybe because Weibo’s content censorship system has trouble recognizing the spelling of Cantonese characters, many posts in spicy, bold, and simple language still survive. But if the same content is written in Mandarin, it is subject to blocking or removal,” said the organization, which is affiliated with the University of California at Berkeley.

In neighboring Cantonese-speaking Hong Kong, anti-government protesters in 2019 often used Cantonese puns both for protest slogans and to guard against possible surveillance by mainland Chinese authorities.

Now, Cantonese appears to offer those fed up with China’s continued zero-Covid lockdowns an avenue for more subtle displays of dissent.

Jean-François Dupré, an assistant professor of political science at TÉLUQ University who has studied Hong Kong’s language policy, said the Chinese government’s increasingly low tolerance for public criticism has pushed its critics to “innovate” in their communication.

“It appears that using non-Mandarin forms of communication could allow dissidents to escape online censorship, at least for a while,” Dupré said.

“This phenomenon speaks to the regime’s growing lack of trust and paranoia, and to the citizens’ continued readiness to resist despite the risks and obstacles.

Although Cantonese shares much of its vocabulary and writing system with Mandarin, many of its slang terms, swear words, and everyday expressions have no equivalent in Mandarin. Its written form also sometimes relies on rarely used and archaic characters, or characters that mean something entirely different in Mandarin, so Cantonese sentences can be difficult for Mandarin readers to understand.

Compared to Mandarin, Cantonese is very colloquial, often informal, and easily lends itself to puns, making it well suited for making up and throwing barbs.

When Hong Kong was rocked by anti-government protests in 2019 — fueled in part by fears that Beijing was encroaching on the city’s autonomy, freedoms and culture — these attributes of Cantonese became very clear.

“Cantonese was, of course, a major vehicle for political grievances during the 2019 protests,” Dupré said, adding that the language gave “a strong local flavor to the protests.”

He pointed out how entirely new typefaces sprang up spontaneously from the pro-democracy movement – ​​including one that combined the characters of “freedom” with popular profanity.

Other games on written characters illustrate the endless creativity of Cantonese, such as a stylized version of “Hong Kong” which, when read from the side, becomes “add oil” – a rallying cry in demonstrations.

Protesters have also found ways to protect their communications, fearing that online chat groups – where they held rallies and railed against authorities – were being monitored by mainland agents.

For example, because spoken Cantonese sounds different from spoken Mandarin, some people have experimented with romanizing Cantonese—spelling sounds using the English alphabet—thus making it virtually impossible for a non-native speaker to understand.

Protesters during a rally against a proposed extradition bill in Hong Kong on May 4, 2019.

And, while protests died down after the Chinese government imposed a sweeping national security law in 2020, Cantonese continues to offer residents of the city a way to express their unique local identity – something that people have long feared losing as the city is drawn more to Beijing. to input.

For some, using Cantonese to criticize the government seems particularly appropriate given that the central government has pushed for Mandarin to be used nationwide in education and daily life – for example, in television broadcasts and other media – often at the expense of regional languages ​​and dialects. .

These efforts turned into national controversy in 2010, when government officials suggested increasing Mandarin programming on Guangzhou’s mostly Cantonese television station – outraged residents, who took part in rare mass rallies and in scuffles with the police.

It’s not just the Cantonese who are affected – many ethnic minorities have expressed concern that the decline of their native languages ​​could spell the end of cultures and ways of life that they believe are already under threat.

In 2020, students and parents in Inner Mongolia staged mass school boycotts over a new policy that replaced the Mongolian language with Mandarin in elementary and middle schools.

Similar fears have long existed in Hong Kong – and grew in the 2010s as more Mandarin-speaking mainlanders began to live and work in the city.

“A growing number of Mandarin-speaking school children have been enrolled in Hong Kong schools and have been seen commuting between Shenzhen and Hong Kong on a daily basis,” Dupré said. “Thanks to these meetings, the language change that has taken place in Guangdong has become quite visible for Hong Kongers.”

He added that these concerns were exacerbated by local government policies that emphasized the role of Mandarin and referred to Cantonese as a “dialect” – infuriating some Hong Kongers who viewed the term as a snub and argued it should be called “language”. ” In place.

Over the past decade, schools in Hong Kong have been encouraged by the government to switch to using Mandarin in Chinese lessons, while others have switched to teaching simplified characters – the written form preferred on the mainland – instead of the traditional characters used in Hong Kong. .

There was further outrage in 2019 when the city’s education chief suggested that the continued use of Cantonese rather than Mandarin in city schools could mean Hong Kong would lose its competitive advantage in the coming.

“Given Hong Kong’s rapid economic and political integration, it would not be surprising to see Hong Kong’s language regime align with that of the mainland, especially with regard to the promotion of Mandarin,” said Dupre.

This is not the first time that people on the mainland have found ways to circumvent censors. Many use emojis to represent taboo phrases, English abbreviations that represent Mandarin phrases, and images like cartoons and digitally altered photos, which are harder for censors to monitor.

But these methods, by their very nature, have their limits. By contrast, for weary Guangzhou residents, Cantonese offers an endless linguistic landscape with which to castigate their rulers.

It’s unclear whether these more subversive uses of Cantonese will encourage greater solidarity among its speakers in southern China — or whether it might encourage the central government to further crack down on the use of local dialects, Dupré said.

A delivery man delivers a package to the entrance of a closed neighborhood in Liwan, Guangzhou, on November 9.

For now though, many Weibo users have taken the rare opportunity to vent their frustration over China’s zero Covid policy, which has battered the country’s economy, isolated it from the rest of the world and disrupted the people’s daily lives with the constant threat of lockdowns and unemployment.

“I hope everyone can maintain their anger,” wrote one Weibo user, noting that most of the posts relating to the Guangzhou lockdowns were in Cantonese.

“Watching Cantonese scolding (authorities) on Weibo without getting caught,” posted another, using characters that mean laughing.

“Learn Cantonese well and browse Weibo without fear.”

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Wolastoqey linguists, longtime friends, hope the language will survive https://anglomir.net/wolastoqey-linguists-longtime-friends-hope-the-language-will-survive/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://anglomir.net/wolastoqey-linguists-longtime-friends-hope-the-language-will-survive/ Norvin Richards remembers the first time he heard the Wolastoqey language – and how much he smiled over the years in the company of those who helped him learn it. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology linguistics professor was attending a conference in Connecticut 15 years ago when he met elder and language guardian Imelda Perley […]]]>

Norvin Richards remembers the first time he heard the Wolastoqey language – and how much he smiled over the years in the company of those who helped him learn it.

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology linguistics professor was attending a conference in Connecticut 15 years ago when he met elder and language guardian Imelda Perley and her friend and fellow linguist Roger Paul.

“If you’ve heard it speak, you know it has this lovely sort of singsong cadence that made me, as a linguist, think, ‘Oh, I’d really like to learn to speak that way,'” Richards said. “It’s just such a beautiful language.”

He and Paul are part of a larger effort to save the Wolastoqey language, which Statistics Canada says has only around 750 speakers left.

Elders pass on language and a nickname

Richards said the language appealed to him, but it was getting to know fluent speakers like Paul and his uncle, the late Raymond Nicholas of Neqotkuk, that hooked him.

“It’s a culture that traditionally seems to place a high value on speaking well, being a storyteller, being a prankster,” Richards said. “And so when these people get together, they have a wonderful time talking, and it’s wonderful to be there.”

Richards spent a sabbatical in northeastern New Brunswick, learning Wolastoqey from “Uncle Raymond” and Imelda Perley, recording traditional stories and trying to understand the rules of the language.

Roger Paul and Elder Imelda Perley met MIT linguist Norvin Richards over a decade ago. Richards says they welcomed him into their community and helped him learn Wolastoqey. (University of New Brunswick Mi’kmaq-Wolastoqey Centre/Twitter)

Paul, said alumni give nicknames to their “favorite linguists who show up,” and Richards is one of them.

His nickname is Mehqituwat, which means “has a red beard,” said Paul, who studied with Richards at MIT and now teaches at the University of Southern Maine.

“Normally the word ‘linguist’ in a community gets a lot of people angry because we once had the wrong kind of linguist come and tell us we didn’t know enough about our own history,” Paul said. .

“But when you have linguists like Mehqituwat come and they’re wonderful people and they fit right into our communities…we kind of adopt them and give them our pet names.”

Richards is now heading for another sabbatical and has set herself the goal of becoming a fluent Wolastoqey speaker by the end of it.

Paul said his friend “already communicates very well” and is close to fluent.

“He even lies to Wolastoqey well,” he joked.

Norvin Richards (back row, second from right) and Roger Paul (back row, far right) became friends after meeting at a language conference 15 years ago. In this photo from 2019, they are on a field trip with MIT students in the Passamaquoddy communities of Pleasant Point and Indian Township. (Submitted by Norvin Richards)

‘It is not too late’

Richards and Paul know the Wolastoqey language is under threat, and both attended a language conference in Fredericton this fall focused on recovery.

“I left feeling better than I had ever felt before because I watched the youth presentations,” Paul said.

Richards agreed that it is the young speakers who will determine the survival of the language.

He knows from his work with the Wampanoag of Massachusetts, relatives of the Wolastoqey, how difficult it is to try to revive a language that has died out.

“They don’t have any speakers,” he said. “But we have many documents, including a complete translation of the Bible and a lot of religious literature and a lot of documents written by native speakers. The Wampanoag are very interested in reconstructing their language from these documents.”

Linguist and MIT professor Norvin Richards hopes his work will help revitalize the Wolastoqey language. During his current sabbatical, his goal is to become a fluent speaker. (Myfanwy Davies/CBC)

By comparison, with 750 speakers, the Wolastoqey are ahead in reclaiming and revitalizing their language.

“It’s wonderful to be here surrounded by these elders and to be reminded in a way that this language still exists, that there are still fluent speakers, that it’s not too late,” said said Richards.

‘Uncle Raymond’ was right

Paul said that when he was young he didn’t appreciate the importance of growing up in a proud indigenous family who refused to speak English and only spoke to him in Wolastoqey.

He didn’t hear English until he was five or six years old, he said, when he “went to day school for a bit”.

“I didn’t start speaking until Sister Jean-Marie started teaching me English.”

Paul only heard English when he was 5 or 6 years old and now appreciates every day how his family taught him the Wolastoqey language and passed on their culture to him. (University of Southern Maine)

Paul remembers going every Saturday to his uncle Raymond’s house in Neqotkuk or Tobique, where the elders would gather and teach him words in Wolastoqey.

“I should sit there and get coached by the elders and tell me what to learn and what to teach.”

At the time, he was “just a young buck, not even knowing where my cock was half the time,” Paul said, remembering how he rolled his eyes at the elders.

Now as a linguist and lecturer at the University of Southern Maine, he wishes he could remember everything they taught him.

“Uncle Raymond had a word for what the bushes looked like after the moose ran through them. And I promised him I’d remember it. But rest his soul, I don’t remember that one. “

Paul doesn’t believe the latest census figures which show there are 750 Wolastoqey speakers, saying he thinks it’s more like 200 or 300, but he believes his language will survive.

“I remember my uncle saying to me – he said to me in the language, ‘One day you’re going to be grateful for teaching you this boy.'”

Now that he is a language teacher, Paul understands the importance of what Uncle Raymond was telling him.

“Every day I get up to come to work, I hear those words in my ear,” he said with a laugh. “Yeah, okay, you were right.

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English-language schools will stay away on Monday – Morrisburg Leader https://anglomir.net/english-language-schools-will-stay-away-on-monday-morrisburg-leader/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 00:00:51 +0000 https://anglomir.net/english-language-schools-will-stay-away-on-monday-morrisburg-leader/ BROCKVILLE/KEMPTVILLE — English-language school boards in the region will be closed on Monday, forcing students to follow distance learning. Since November 4, the Canadian Union of Public Employees has been on strike in what the union calls a political protest against the Ontario government’s passage of Bill 28. The bill prohibited 55 000 union employees […]]]>

BROCKVILLE/KEMPTVILLE — English-language school boards in the region will be closed on Monday, forcing students to follow distance learning.

Since November 4, the Canadian Union of Public Employees has been on strike in what the union calls a political protest against the Ontario government’s passage of Bill 28. The bill prohibited 55 000 union employees to strike and imposed a four-year contract. Section 33 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, known as the notwithstanding clause, was invoked by the government.

In a message to families Nov. 6, the Upper Canada District School Board said schools will be closed Nov. 7 and students will learn from home remotely. Mo additional closing days have been released by the council, but union and council sources tell the leader schools are likely to be closed until Wednesday at the earliest.

The Catholic District School Board of Eastern Ontario has also closed its schools and moved to remote learning. CDSBEO officials wrote Sunday that its schools would be closed indefinitely.

Both councils say that without custodians, education workers and other staff represented by CUPE, schools cannot be open for safe learning.

The union has been without a contract since the end of August. Wage negotiations have stalled, with the union demanding an 11% raise for its workers. The government is proposing a series of two-tier increases of 2.5% for workers earning less than $43,000 a year and 1.5% for those earning more than that.

More than one million students are currently out of school due to the labor problem. Following the passage of Bill 28, the government asked the Ontario Labor Relations Board to stop industrial action.

The labor action and previous government legislation are unpopular with Ontarians, especially with respect to the government’s handling of the education crisis.

According to a November 6 poll by polling firm Abacus Data, of those polled by the company, 62% blamed Premier Doug Ford and his government for the current situation, and 71% want the government to negotiate a deal. fairly with education workers.

Almost half (48 per cent) of respondents said they supported other public sector unions joining industrial action, while 32 per cent said they were against such action. Twenty percent answered unsure.

Regarding the Ford government’s use of the notwithstanding clause, 50% said they opposed it.

Although the government’s handling of the situation is unpopular, 57% of those polled said they would be more likely to vote for the PC or that their support for the party would not have changed if an election were held now.

The OLRB concluded Sunday around 6 p.m. three days of hearings on the legality of the strike movement.

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Abracadabra, this magic trick is now a matter of language https://anglomir.net/abracadabra-this-magic-trick-is-now-a-matter-of-language/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 21:25:00 +0000 https://anglomir.net/abracadabra-this-magic-trick-is-now-a-matter-of-language/ Someone recently brought to our attention an article that talked about the famous magic trick where the magician saws his assistant in half. The question of how the trick is performed caught our attention – that is, until a beautiful, shiny linguistic question magically appeared. What caught our attention was the question of how to […]]]>

Someone recently brought to our attention an article that talked about the famous magic trick where the magician saws his assistant in half. The question of how the trick is performed caught our attention – that is, until a beautiful, shiny linguistic question magically appeared.

What caught our attention was the question of how to talk about the trick later. Would you say the magician’s assistant was “sawn” in half, or were they “sawn” in half? Although we hope neither is true, either is acceptable.

The verb “saw” goes back to the noun “saw”. This is what linguists would call a “functional change”, which is when a word changes part of speech. There are many such changes in English, including “the drink/to drink”, “the tower/to tower over”, “the switch/to switch”, etc.

By the 13e century, “saw” had made its transition from noun to verb. It is a regular verb, so the past tense is “saw” and the past participle is “a sawed”.

In the 15e century, speakers began to create an irregular “saw” shape for the past tense and the past participle. Irregular verbs involve a change of vowel, for example, “to draw” in the past tense is “to draw”.

This is what happened to “seen”. The past tense changed vowel and became something like “soo”. The past participle became “sawn”, in the same way that the past participle of “draw” is “drawn”.

The irregular past tense of “seen” has died out, but the past participle “sawed” has remained. It is more popular in British English, while American English tends to prefer the regular form “sawn”.

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What a Look at the Academic Books Available in India Reveals on the Translation and Language Debate https://anglomir.net/what-a-look-at-the-academic-books-available-in-india-reveals-on-the-translation-and-language-debate/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 22:41:53 +0000 https://anglomir.net/what-a-look-at-the-academic-books-available-in-india-reveals-on-the-translation-and-language-debate/ About ten years ago, anxious to find books in Hindi to help the faculty of SCERT and the teacher training colleges with which I was associated, I walked into the library of the Central Institute of Education (CIE) in New Delhi. The institute offers a pre-employment teacher preparation program in Hindi as well as English […]]]>

About ten years ago, anxious to find books in Hindi to help the faculty of SCERT and the teacher training colleges with which I was associated, I walked into the library of the Central Institute of Education (CIE) in New Delhi. The institute offers a pre-employment teacher preparation program in Hindi as well as English and the postgraduate program also allows students to take exams and the thesis in Hindi. I was impressed with the volume and variety of books in the library. And once I had taken my eyes and mind off the books displayed in different disciplines, I asked for the Hindi section. The exhibition of books in English made me anticipate the end of my search for documents in Hindi that I could bring back to our institutions to enrich our discussions and conversations. Two piles of guidebooks and exam preparation materials were all there was in the Hindi section! It came as a brutal shock.

As I hunted, it became clear that this was a common experience for anyone visiting the libraries of educational institutions providing instruction in an Indian language. The volume, variety and nature of books available in English for any discipline are many times greater than those available in Hindi or any other Indian language. In a good library at a college or even a high school, where there are shelves and shelves of books in English, the number of books in other languages ​​is miniscule. What is even more painful is that the only books available in Indian languages ​​are usually exam keys and guides, which do not help the reader to engage in knowledge at the level of ideas and concepts. . They lack in-depth speeches and nuanced discussions.

Sporadic efforts have been made to collect existing documents in Hindi and to translate the documents into Hindi and other Indian languages ​​by individuals and, in some cases, organizations. Most of these efforts have been short-lived and have little to show for the materials available or their quality. There are not many academic sharing forums where current ideas and new analyzes can be presented in Indian languages. Since most schools and even colleges have courses in Indian languages ​​even when exams are to be written in English, this lack of materials and forums is crippling for knowledge to be internalized and for people in the field to convert their experience. in knowledge.

The experience of people working with schools and children does not benefit from the reflections of their peers because there is no way in which they can document and share it. The analysis of what they see, struggle, experience and achieve remains circumscribed by the knowledge available in books, which are rarely in a language other than English. Field experiences are therefore neither shared nor widely known. Furthermore, they do not form the basis on which further analysis can be carried out. The absence of forums for sharing ideas in Indian languages ​​leaves little room for the documentation of experiences and reflections. Lack of critical feedback will limit the learning process. This is a great obstacle to the development of ideas of education and learning based on the context of the struggles of teachers and students.

Recognizing this incongruity is an important first step in addressing it, but the road ahead is long and difficult. It is a question of creating forums of expression and discussion in Indian languages. It commands academic respect for those who contribute to the knowledge of these languages. It therefore requires a two-pronged approach.

First, hold academic seminars and conferences in regional languages ​​and ensure that all seminars and conferences invite papers and commentaries in those languages. And second, to increase access to existing documents in various disciplines in these languages ​​by translating quality texts.

There are many challenges in this journey, and they must be overcome, but the most difficult part is the non-acceptance of articles and writings in Indian languages ​​as academic work for credit in academic circles, including universities. Papers and conference presentations written in languages ​​are also not respected and work on academic translations is not accepted as an academic endeavor (although we know how difficult it is to translate a good academic text) . It is not just a question of finding equivalent words, which is in itself complex, but of placing the idea in the context of a different language and culture without altering the essence of what the author wants to convey is not an easy task.

Another big challenge in this way of making materials widely available is the issue of copyright. It is not easy to obtain authorizations to translate texts which can form the basis of learning for various disciplines. The task is even more difficult if the goal is to make the translation freely accessible. It is difficult to reach the people who own the copyright and then to convince them of the usefulness of this accessibility. As a team at Azim Premji University, it has been a journey of learning and discovery to create the possibility of this access through a repository. This is a small part of the University’s efforts to make access to quality higher education inclusive and to ensure that the public education system becomes increasingly dynamic, reflective and self-correcting.

Hriday Kant Dewan leads the Translation Initiative, Anuvada Sampada, at Azim Premji University

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FTC Digital Advertising for Kids Event Examines Relationships Between Brands and Influencers https://anglomir.net/ftc-digital-advertising-for-kids-event-examines-relationships-between-brands-and-influencers/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 17:08:23 +0000 https://anglomir.net/ftc-digital-advertising-for-kids-event-examines-relationships-between-brands-and-influencers/ The ever-changing nature of online advertising often leaves children most vulnerable to their messages, knowingly or unknowingly. However, in the world of digital advertising, today’s children are even more susceptible to advertisements that obscure the differences between advertising and entertainment, brought about in part by so-called influencer culture. As part of receiving public comment on […]]]>

The ever-changing nature of online advertising often leaves children most vulnerable to their messages, knowingly or unknowingly.

However, in the world of digital advertising, today’s children are even more susceptible to advertisements that obscure the differences between advertising and entertainment, brought about in part by so-called influencer culture.

As part of receiving public comment on the effects of online advertising on children, staff from the U.S. Federal Trade Commission hosted a day-long virtual webinar titled “Protecting Children from stealth advertising in digital media” on October 19, which was attended by children’s privacy advocates and advertising industry insiders. Topics included the psychology of children and teens that makes them more receptive to blurry advertising, the harms of stealth targeted ads, and potential solutions.

“Advertising has changed a lot over the past few decades,” said FTC Chairwoman Lina Khan. “Previously, every kid watching a TV show would see the same ad, and it wasn’t hard for parents to keep tabs on what ads their kids were seeing. The rise of social media and targeted advertising has changed everything. Now each child is an audience of one.

“They interact with digital technologies almost intuitively,” she continued. “It also carries a serious risk (because) when children interact with digital media, they are exposed to an array of marketing practices that blur the line between advertising and entertainment.”

During a panel discussion, Common Sense senior privacy program director Girard Kelly said that more than half of tweens and teens “use TV, online videos, mobile games and media every day”, those aged 13 to 18 exceeding the most. more than eight hours of screen time per day, according to a survey conducted by his organization.

Kelly said ads are now targeted at kids and teens who virtually identify their exact emotional state at a specific time in an effort to manipulate their attitudes towards buying a certain brand or product. produced at a time when they are particularly vulnerable, such as after a breakup. with a partner.

“The timing or frequency is really important,” Kelly said. “If children and teens are exposed to ads all day, but to be effective, blurry ads require engagement at the precise moment. So maybe that’s when the child or can -be other children who profile themselves as them are most likely to be suggested.

Fairplay executive director Josh Grolin said children who gravitate towards products reviewed by online influencers through “parasocial relationships” often believe they have some sort of relationship with an online personality, a he declared.

As a result, Grolin said influencers required to disclose any paid relationship they have with a specific product or brand wouldn’t get to the heart of the matter, as kids and teens can end up developing positive attitudes towards a product or brand. certain product even if it has been used. in the initial branded content.

“Children are less likely to understand what is happening and to be able to defend themselves against (advertising through parasocial relationships), in fact even adults are less likely to defend themselves against the marketing of influence,” Grolin said. “It’s completely unrealistic to think that at this point children will activate these complex cognitive processes in order to defend themselves against these ads.”

During the panel that explored solutions to better regulate fuzzy advertising, Josh Blumenfeld, YouTube’s managing director for global policy and advocacy, said his company had conducted three rounds of research to determine the extent to which children, parents and childhood development experts understood how digital marketing works.

At first, Blumenfeld said only one in 10 children understood the meaning of “paid promotion.” YouTube Kids doesn’t allow personalized ads, while standard YouTube allows blur ads with disclosure.

In the next round, YouTube incorporated images, text, and iconography that children and parents reported as helpful to help them better understand the ad. Blumenfeld said YouTube created a 30-second “plain English” video to pair with content from the channel’s creators, informing viewers that the channel’s creator had received compensation from a brand.

“These three elements are a distinctive visual icon, easy-to-read text, and a fully animated educational video,” Blumenfeld said. “We found that once we implemented this, we went back to all of our test subjects. And we found that the majority of children were able to identify disclosure…and they were able to identify (the) three really key concepts (pictures, text, and iconography).

Going forward, fuller disclosures between content creators and brands that pay for placement need to be made clearer to audiences of all ages, said Encode Justice President and Founder Sneha Revanur, who has added that it would be a great first step. She said that to promote the most understanding among users about creator-brand relationships, she urged that these disclosures be placed prominently near the content of the webpage and formatted similarly.

“Disclosures should clearly state who is paying for an advertisement and should generally include any information that could affect a consumer’s decision to purchase a product,” Revanur said. “A disclosure must be visually accessible, and the syntax and language must be easy to understand. Users should be able to see this information clearly and clearly, they should not have to scroll through it. »

At the end of the workshop, the FTC’s associate director of advertising practices, Serena Viswanathan, said the panelists’ comments would be incorporated into possible future regulations to restrict blurry advertising to children. However, she provided a general timeline indicating when such regulation might begin. The FTC’s public comment portal on digital advertising to children is open until November 17.

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Duolingo’s Hyper-Localized Language Launch Campaign Boosts Bengali to English Course to Second Position in India https://anglomir.net/duolingos-hyper-localized-language-launch-campaign-boosts-bengali-to-english-course-to-second-position-in-india/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 08:05:10 +0000 https://anglomir.net/duolingos-hyper-localized-language-launch-campaign-boosts-bengali-to-english-course-to-second-position-in-india/ Conceptualized and executed by Digitas India, the ‘Ankhon Bangla Jaanle Engriji Eiji’ campaign has propelled English learning for Bengali speakers to the top of the charts. Digitas India has successfully concluded an integrated advertising campaign for Duolingo, the world’s most popular language learning app, which enables users to learn from over 100 courses in over […]]]>

Conceptualized and executed by Digitas India, the ‘Ankhon Bangla Jaanle Engriji Eiji’ campaign has propelled English learning for Bengali speakers to the top of the charts.

Digitas India has successfully concluded an integrated advertising campaign for Duolingo, the world’s most popular language learning app, which enables users to learn from over 100 courses in over 40 languages ​​in India. The hyper-localized campaign that was staged for Bengali-speaking markets, with a particular focus on Kolkata, resulted in positive business results for the brand.

As there was a growing need and demand from the Bengali speaking audience in India for an effective English language course, it was imperative to build a narrative based on an understanding of the cultural nuances of the market. It had to be personalized and presented in a way that resonated deeply with local audiences.

The central narrative was therefore based on the fact that if one understands a complex and complicated language like Bengali, understanding English becomes so much easier! This led to the rise of the phrase Ankhon Bangla Jaanle Engriji Eiji which translates to “If you know Bengali, then learning English is easy”. Incorporating information based on daily behaviors and lifestyles in Bengali-speaking markets, the advertisements integrated humor, food, relationships, traffic and festivities into the main content. The campaign was also designed to accurately represent Duolingo’s core principles of being fun, free, and effective.

Commenting on the ad campaign, Karan Kapany, Country Director of Duolingo, said, “Indians are largely multilingual and are constantly adding new language skills to their repertoire. While English can often be seen as an intimidating language to learn, many fail to realize that local Indian languages ​​are far more nuanced and complex, making learning English easier in comparison.

“While we wanted to encourage Bengali speakers across India and Bangladesh to add English to their language portfolio, it was important to tailor communication in a way that was extremely relevant, localized and engaging. We were successful to do so effectively and have seen phenomenal growth in Bengali-speaking cities and audiences. India is one of the fastest growing markets for Duolingo and with the successful launch of Bengali, we see great potential for introduce even more regional languages ​​in the future,” he added.

The linguistic launch campaign was deployed on media often frequented by the Bengali-speaking public. Radio jingles composed by the famous Surojit Chatterjee and sung by the incredibly talented Ananya Chakraborty on popular radio stations in West Bengal, OOH in major cities of West Bengal, Metro takeover in Kolkata, branded candy boxes and digital movies on social media and YouTube – the rollout of the targeted 360 degree campaign has proven to be very effective.

Achieving the business goal it set itself, the campaign effortlessly propelled the Bengali to English course to second place in India in just a week of deployment, moving it up several rungs on the ladder. popularity of the language in India. The app saw a whopping 400% increase in active users after the launch of the campaign, with Kolkata becoming the 3rd largest Duolingo user market in India.

Sharing her perspective on the campaign and its success story, Sonia Khurana, COO of Digitas India, said, “We think it’s the simplicity of the idea behind the idea, as well as the conscious and impeccable execution that made this campaign a huge success. More so, the team had a ton of fun bringing this idea to life – it’s campaigns like this that are worth it!”

Digitas India won the digital AOR for Duolingo India earlier this year and was responsible for cross-channel strategy and integrated campaigns.

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